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Monday, October 9
 

7:30am

Continental Breakfast
Monday October 9, 2017 7:30am - 10:00am
Colorado Ballrooms

7:30am

Registration
Monday October 9, 2017 7:30am - 5:00pm
Colorado Ballrooms

8:00am

9:00am

Carnegie Classification Preparation Workshop (Ticketed Event)
In 2020, 35 CUMU members will be eligible to receive the classification and 12 will be eligible for reclassification. Join John Saltmarsh, University of Massachusetts, Boston; Mathew Johnson, Brown University; Brenda Marsteller Kowalewski, Weber State University; for a pre-conference signature workshop designed to address preparation for both first-time applicants and campuses that are reclassifying (those classified in 2010) for the Carnegie Community Engagement classification. LEARN MORE

Monday October 9, 2017 9:00am - 12:00pm
Colorado G

10:00am

CUMU Executive Committee Meeting
Monday October 9, 2017 10:00am - 12:00pm
Matchless Board Room

10:15am

The Nonprofit Infrastructure Initiative (NPII): A Collaborative, Inclusive Approach to Community Connectedness (30 mins)
Looking at how three different institutions have come together to work with a local community. The southern sector of this Texas city presents the greatest opportunity for growth. It’s made up of the largest inventory of land and workforce potential in this metropolitan city. However, the area has challenges. The area is home to 45% of the city’s families, but represents 15% of the tax base. Additionally, the southern sector is home to the majority of neighborhoods that exceed 41% poverty.
A collection of grassroots organizations made up of small nonprofits, churches, and neighborhood organizations seek to provide needed services. The goal of NPII is to position 10 small nonprofit organizations for greater capacity in serving their local community. Using a collaborative, inclusive approach, the United Way of Metropolitan Dallas, the University of North Texas at Dallas and the State Fair of Texas created this initiative to strengthen and support these organizations through education, resource networking, and investment. You will hear from one of the community organizations participating in NPII along with representatives from United Way of North Texas at Dallas and the University of North Texas at Dallas.

Speakers
CL

Constance Lacy

Dean, School of Human Services, University of North Texas at Dallas
NN

Nissy New

Director, Income Impact, United Way of Metropolitan Dallas
United Way; Workforce Development; Financial Capability/Literacy; grants


Monday October 9, 2017 10:15am - 10:45am
Colorado A

10:15am

Urban Engagement, Collaboration, & Success: connecting an urban state university and an urban public high school focusing on Student Success and Retention through Teaching, Learning, Curriculum Transformation/Alignment, and Professional Development (30 mi
Challenging, Energizing, and Rewarding! Building collaborative success between an urban state university and an urban public high school invigorates and enriches both institutions. Careful data collection and assessment has driven program development, policy, and procedure to ensure student success and retention while engaging teaching faculties through professional development opportunities. This session will examine the 10 year history and data of this urban collaboration that has successfully provided opportunity for high school students to enroll in on-campus university courses while completing their high school diploma.
Educational goals and objectives, lessons learned, and assessment will be shared along with implementation of best practices.

Speakers
LF

Lauren Franklin

Crispus Attucks Medical Magnet High School of the Indianapolis Public Schools District
avatar for J.R. Russell, Ph.D.

J.R. Russell, Ph.D.

Director of Early College Entrance, IUPUI
Dr. J.R. Russell is the Director of the Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) SPAN Division, a post he has held since 1996. The SPAN Division is home to Early College Entrance (ECE) and Accelerated College Immersion (ACI) programs for the Indianapolis camp... Read More →


Monday October 9, 2017 10:15am - 10:45am
Colorado B

10:15am

A Chief Diversity Officer can’t do it alone: Ideas for creating a truly inclusive campus (45 mins)
In a society that is more polarized than ever, how do we, as leaders with boots on the ground and accountability at the highest levels, ensure that every one of our students are empowered, respectful of differences and safe? How can we create a collective understanding and practice of equity and inclusion among faculty, staff and students? This Community Conversation will begin with some best practices from diversity leaders representing the University of Denver (DU), the University of Colorado Denver (CU Denver) and Metropolitan State University of Denver (MSU Denver). We expect a lively and productive conversation.



Speakers
avatar for Brenda Allen

Brenda Allen

Vice Chancellor, University of Colorado Denver
Dr. Brenda J. Allen is the Vice Chancellor for Diversity and Inclusion at the University of Colorado Denver | Anschutz Medical Campus. She also is a Professor of Communication. Her scholarship focuses on organizational communication and diversity. Dr. Allen was recruited from Howard University to the University of Colorado Boulder in 1989 as an Assistant... Read More →
MA

Myron Anderson

Associate to the President for Diversity, Metropolitan State University of Denver
Myron Anderson serves Metropolitan State University of Denver as the associate to the president for diversity. A member of the president’s cabinet, Anderson is the University’s chief diversity officer responsible for articulating and resolving current and future issues related to diversity. Furthermore, Anderson identifies campus climate trends that may assist in developing strategies to pro-actively promote... Read More →
FT

Frank Tuitt

Senior Advisory to the Chancellor & Provost, University of Denver


Monday October 9, 2017 10:15am - 11:00am
Colorado C

10:15am

Community Partners: Promising Practices for Listening and Understanding Needs (45 mins)
With a mission statement focused on impacting the social good, the Division of Community Engagement at California State University San Marcos (CSUSM) set out to better understand the most pressing social needs facing its communities. In this session the Division’s leadership team will share the structure and framework that guide the ongoing work of connecting with and listening to the communities served by the University. Additionally, we will present two promising practices – Team Listening Tours and Community Dinners – that are helping the Division to further expand its partnerships and enhance its impact. Outcomes, lessons learned and source materials will be shared with session participants. Lastly, participants will engage in small group discussions to facilitate additional promising practice sharing and idea generation.

Speakers
SG

Scott Gross

California State University, San Marcos
avatar for Patricia L. Prado-Olmos

Patricia L. Prado-Olmos

Vice President, CSUSM
avatar for Sarah Villarreal

Sarah Villarreal

Associate Vice President, CSUSM


Monday October 9, 2017 10:15am - 11:00am
Denver 6

10:15am

Serving Undocumented Students and their Families (45 mins)
Over the years, access to post-secondary education has been elusive for undocumented students. Immigration policy, lack of financial assistance, and school infrastructure are some of the impediments that challenge undocumented students in their pursuit of higher education. While undocumented students have access to free public K-12 education, once they graduate high school they are left on their own by the public educational system (Frum, 2007). The purpose of this presentation is to highlight California State University, San Bernardino’s (CSUSB) approach to serving the growing number of undocumented students entering the university.
In order to determine the needs of these students, university staff conducted a series of intentional interventions, including telemarketing campaigns, email communication, and focus groups. Through this process, the university was able to capture information from undocumented students regarding the challenges they face as they navigate their way in a college setting. The findings prompted CSUSB educational leaders to take transformational steps to change the culture of the campus to attract, support, and graduate this emerging student population. First, the presentation will provide an overview of the feedback provided by students. Second, the presentation will detail the strategies implemented to address the student feedback. Finally, the presentation will discuss current immigration policies and the steps CSUSB is taking to continue serving the undocumented student population and their families.

Speakers
MB

Maria Barragan

DREAMers Center Coordinator, CSU, San Bernardino
YO

Yadira Ortiz

Admission Counselor, California State University San Bernardino
OR

Olivia Rosas

Associate Vice President of Enrollment Management, CSUSB


Monday October 9, 2017 10:15am - 11:00am
Colorado D

10:15am

The White Shadow: Urban Settings, Race, and Community Engagement (90 mins)
As urban predominantly white institutions (PWIs) attempt to broaden and deepen their local, national, and global relationships through efforts in community engagement or bi-/multi-directional community-university partnerships, whiteness must play a critical role in the conversation. To ensure the greatest amount of authenticity in community-university relationships, PWIs participating in institutional efforts around community engagement need to address racial dynamics, understand collective whiteness and privilege, and consider their subjective identities. This presentation will explore how the urban PWI exists as a white shadow within community. The facilitators will open the Community Conversation with a brief historical overview of Marquette University—a mid-sized, liberal arts, PWI, that is Catholic, and Jesuit—and its relationship with the Milwaukee community, which some statistics show is the most segregated city in the country. Then, the presenters will shift to recent institutional efforts to deepen local, national, and global community engagement and the ways race has impacted the early stages of these initiatives. The community conversation will consider the role of race in PWIs’ historical relationships with the communities, and explore the contemporary problems, practices, and ideas related to race and community engagement. As bell hooks recommends in Teaching Community (2003), we must consider “what everyone can do to decolonize their minds to maintain awareness, change behavior, and create beloved community.” Failure to do so opposes community and perpetuates the long shadow cast by whiteness.

Speakers
DB

Dan Bergen

Executive Director, Community Engagement, Marquette University
CB

Cedric Burrows

Assistant Professor, English, Marquette University


Monday October 9, 2017 10:15am - 11:45am
Colorado J

10:15am

Wholes and Parts: Harmonizing Focused Community-Engaged Research Studies for Comprehensive Urban Understanding (90 mins)
Cities are complicated places with overlapping issues and problems. Studies and reports help us to glimpse their particular traits, but they do not always help illustrate the interrelationship of issues. Understanding the layers and interactions between them is important because urbanites do not separate their lives into neat boxes as easily as academics when studying them.

For example, millions of urban American children bring to school issues emanating from homes, families, and neighborhoods that have clear impact on their academic achievement. Studies of school performance, however, often stop at the edge of school buildings. Yet, doing research that explores what happens at home and in school, in neighborhoods and on busses, in families and with friends, leads to more textured understanding of urban complexities. Urban universities, particularly public institutions, are well-poised to do this sort of research which will, in turn, yield better and more nuanced decision-making in various urban institutions.

Through a dialogic approach including audience members, this panel looks at inter-related issues in a mid-sized urban area -- Worcester, MA, New England’s second largest city -- and how its public university and area community organizations seek to integrate multiple single-issue studies into a more comprehensive whole for use by policy-makers, researchers, and institutions. Specific research areas include adverse childhood experiences, refugee-related issues, the opiate epidemic, and impact of cultural differences, and the settings in which they collide including schools, hospitals, and City Hall. Panelists will spark fruitful discussion about using community-engaged scholarship for municipal and citizen benefit.

Speakers
AB

Alex Briesacher

Assistant Professor of Sociology, Worcester State University
I am a quantitative sociologist with a focus on race and ethnicity, and social psychology. The current research team that I am working with involves analyzing disciplinary data within the public school systems in Massachusetts in order to develop a more trauma informed approach t... Read More →
TC

Thomas Conroy

Chair and Professor of Urban Studies, Worcester State University
LL

Linda Larrivee

Dean of Education, Health, and Natural Sciences, Worcester State University
TM

Timothy Murphy

Assistant Professor, Worcester State University
KW

Kirby Wycoff

Assistant Professor, Worcester State University


Monday October 9, 2017 10:15am - 11:45am
Colorado I

10:45am

Community-engaged teaching partnership at Marquette University (30 mins)
This presentation describes a community-engaged teaching partnership at Marquette University to demonstrate the utility of bi-directional, mutually beneficial collaboration between community stakeholders and Marquette University faculty and students. Working with community stakeholders to research topics of great importance for the communities (e.g., where does violent crime concentrate, what type of violent crime is most prevalent), students (a) experience the importance of professionalism and responsibilities that accompany investigation of pressing problems in the communities, (b) analyze spatially-referenced data to understand violent crime patterns, and (c) develop strategies for violence prevention and reduction. Because of active engagement of communities in the learning process, Marquette University students develop a greater level of dedication, interest, and care about the health and wellbeing of Milwaukee communities. At the same time, community stakeholders develop working relationships with Marquette faculty and students and capitalize upon these ties to address important issues occurring in Milwaukee communities.

Speakers
avatar for Aleksandra Snowden

Aleksandra Snowden

Assistant Professor, Criminology, Marquette University


Monday October 9, 2017 10:45am - 11:15am
Colorado B

10:45am

What is the role of “Place” in Community-Embedded Engagement Centers? (30 mins)
Urban institutions seeking to engage their local communities and to invigorate their research and education opportunities are employing a range of geographically-focused engagement frameworks. These place-based frameworks are categorized as Stewardship of Place, Anchor Institution, and Metropolitan University approaches. Each framework requires careful structural, paradigmatic, and physical planning to ensure that an institution’s investments succeed. Ironically, the influence and agency of place can be overlooked in these strategies, yet can profoundly shape way that place-based frameworks unfold.
Our paper describes emplacing place-based frameworks by showcasing the University of Pittsburgh’s new Community Engagement Center framework. Pitt is a premier research university, located in Pittsburgh—an American “comeback city” that transitioned to a post-industrial, knowledge-based economy. The city’s newfound successes are not evenly shared, and broad place-based inequalities marginalize historically-disadvantaged populations. The University of Pittsburgh has emphasized community engagement as part of a new strategic plan, and is opening several Community Engagement Centers to build local opportunity in neighborhoods that are not sharing in the city’s new renaissance.
Our discussion highlights the paradigmatic shifts arising from emplaced engagement. These include the need to account for the agency of place when developing community emplaced centers; to attend to community development theories and frameworks in addition to those associated with community-campus engagement; to adopt democratic civic engagement as an orientation to neighborhood emplaced work; and to build the boundary-spanning capacity of those university stakeholders working in such spaces.

Speakers
avatar for Lina Dostilio

Lina Dostilio

Assistant Vice Chancellor, Community Engagement, University of Pittsburgh
avatar for Michael Glass

Michael Glass

Professor Urban Studies, University of Pittsburgh


Monday October 9, 2017 10:45am - 11:15am
Colorado A

11:00am

Seeking Sanctuary? Intersectionality, Critical Race Theory, and Social Justice in Higher Education (45 mins)
What does it mean to offer or seek the status of a sanctuary school? Common understandings of the word sanctuary suggest a place of refuge or safety. The etymology of the word sanctuary originates from the Latin root sanitarium, translating into a keeper of holy or sacred things. While students are not a thing, despite neoliberal influences, they are precious, and there are few endeavors more sacred than playing a role in the education of students, especially those marginalized in our society. Within higher education, the demographics of an institution’s students often shapes institutional mission, vision, and values; and there are many demographic designations such as HSI, MSI, API, PWI, and so on. Is the Sanctuary Movement another designation, or does it represent an opportunity for institutional transformation? Beyond educating, protecting, and supporting students regardless of their citizenship status, what are the overarching goals of a Sanctuary designation? Moreover, how do we situate the sanctuary designation in relationship to other contemporary social movements such as #BlackLivesMatter and the Women’s Movement and their PussyHat Project? Given that higher education, as a social institution, shares a responsibility in enacting oppression, as well as promoting social justice, are we fit to offer sanctuary? These critical questions invite exploration of the present or possible, social and material manifestations of a sanctuary designation. The tenants of Critical Race Theory and Intersectionality provide analytical and heuristics tools for investigating the Sanctuary Movement.

Speakers
avatar for Issac Carter

Issac Carter

Assistant Professor, University of LaVerne
Issac Carter, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor and Program Chair for the Social justice Higher Education Program for the LaFetra College of Education, at the University of La Verne. Dr. Carter’s research interests are interdisciplinary and foreground Intersectionality, Critical... Read More →


Monday October 9, 2017 11:00am - 11:45am
Colorado D

11:00am

Community-Engaged Scholarship: Connecting Teaching, Research and Service (45 mins)
Have you been involved in community engaged work and find yourself challenged in connecting your teaching, research, and service to community engagement? This tension is greater for junior faculty and those seeking promotion to full professor, particularly when there is no connection among teaching, research, and service. If there is a lack of connection among these three pieces, faculty may find themselves involved in separate projects, which may prove to be time-consuming and detrimental to their work. This session will explore how to consolidate community engaged work and have it reflected in your teaching, research, and service. We will describe a system by which all of those activities can be done as a unified whole for those interested in community engagement. Participants will have the opportunity to look at their own teaching or service activities and plot how it can inform other aspects of their scholarly agenda.

Speakers
HC

Henry Cunningham

Director, Community Engagement, University of Louisville


Monday October 9, 2017 11:00am - 11:45am
Denver 6

11:00am

Supporting and Including Immigrant and Undocumented Students in Higher Education (45 mins)
This presentation focuses on how to better support immigrant students in higher education. First, we will present information about the needs, challenges and strengths of immigrant students. This includes an overview of different visas and documentation statuses, and federal and state policies affecting their higher education access, as well as current experiences of immigrant students. Second, we discuss two examples of strategies to enhance inclusion for immigrant students at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. One is a petition to the university’s Chancellor put together by the Latinx/Hispanic Faculty and Staff Caucus focused on inclusive institutional policies and overall university environment. The other is the development of ‘We Come in Peace’, a student-led organization that supports and advocates for undocumented students at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. We present the progress of these initiatives as well as the ongoing barriers to success.
Building on this information, we will facilitate a workshop in which attendees work on their own strategies for promoting inclusion for immigrant students at their institutions, recognizing that specific strategies depend on their university’s location (state and local policies), student demographics, administration, and existing programs. In particular, attendees identify one initiative they wish to focus on and develop that idea, using feedback from presenters and their fellow attendees. They can bring this back to their university and implement it.

Speakers
avatar for Elisa Benitez

Elisa Benitez

Graduate Student / Community Organizer, Alerta Migratoria NC
I am currently in the second year of my M.A. program in Latin American Studies at UNC Charlotte. My research is focused on the undocumented youth movement from 2007-present and how their activism transformed the greater conversation on CIR, as well as challenged what it means to... Read More →
AV

Ana Valdez Curiel

Founder, We Come In Peace
avatar for Claire Schuch

Claire Schuch

Receptivity, Inclusion, and Community Engagement Postdoctoral Fellow, UNC Charlotte


Monday October 9, 2017 11:00am - 11:45am
Colorado C

11:15am

Anchoring Access and Success at RU-N (30 mins)
From Fall 2012 to Fall 2016, Rutgers University – Newark increased its enrollment of residents of the City of Newark over 40% and its enrollment of students from the surrounding metropolitan region (Irvington, Orange, and East Orange). This outcome is a non-accidental product of our strategic plan, “Where Opportunity Meets Excellence,” that charts a course to increase access to and degree completion for the predominantly first-generation and low-income students that our research university serves—and to ensure that the benefits of these efforts are especially felt in the city for which the university functions as an anchor institution. The initiatives that have been created or expanded to this end reach from traditional enrollment management offices and academic units to student affairs and, via the Newark City of Learning Collaborative, beyond to local schools and community colleges, churches and community-based organizations, and foundations. The highly collaborative approach that we have pursued has yielded not only results, but also interesting innovations in curriculum, honors education, financial aid delivery, and college access and financial literacy education. We will focus our presentation on describing these innovations in terms meant to promote their adoption at other institutions.

Speakers
JG

John Gunkel

Vice Chancellor, Rutgers University Newark, Chancellor's office
BL

Bil Leipold

Associate Vice Chancellor, Rutgers University- Newark


Monday October 9, 2017 11:15am - 11:45am
Colorado B

11:15am

Ten years as a Division of Community Engagement: What? So What? Now What? (30 mins)
In 2017, the Division of Community Engagement (DCE) at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) celebrated its ten year anniversary, offering a unique opportunity to critically reflect and ask ourselves:
• 'What' have the activities and services of the DCE meant to faculty, students, and community partners?
• 'So what' has the existence of a centralized unit done for teaching, research and the public service mission of the university?
• 'Now what' do we do over the next 10 years to continue to add value and promote community and civic engagement at the university?

This reflection allowed us to develop a compelling value proposition for a central academic support unit dedicated to community-academic engagement. In business marketing, a value proposition is a positioning statement that explains how a company provides unique benefit to its customers. We see the development of a value proposition as crucial given the changing context of public, urban institutions of higher education (e.g., changing budget models, demonstration of impact, etc.).

This session utilizes videos of VCU faculty and recent alumni to highlight the "What?' and 'So What?' of the DCE’s contribution to VCU and the community.
We then employ another common business tool, the SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis, to dive deep into the 'Now What?'

Participants are invited to conduct a mini, action-based SWOT analysis calling upon their own experiences and questions about the future. Participants will leave the session with an action plan for developing their own value proposition.

Speakers
JE

Jennifer Early

Director of Community-Engaged Research, VCU
Jennifer Early works in VCU's Division of Community Engagement as the interim director of community-engaged research to support and advance community-engaged research (CEnR) as part of the university's strategic effort to align university-wide community engagement and impact... Read More →
avatar for Catherine Howard

Catherine Howard

Vice Provost, Virginia Commonwealth University Division of Community Engagement


Monday October 9, 2017 11:15am - 11:45am
Colorado A

12:00pm

Opening Lunch–Voices from the Field
The official kick-off of the conference begins with lunch and an engaging series of TED-style talks from leaders and scholars from our institutions.

Introductory Remarks:
Bobbie Laur, Executive Director, CUMU

Keynote Speakers:
  • Barbara Holland, Consultant, Holland Consulting and Strategy Advisor, CUMU
  • Ted Howard, President and Co-Founder, The Democracy Collaborative
  • Andrew Seligsohn, President, Campus Compact

Speakers
avatar for Barbara Holland

Barbara Holland

Consultant and Strategy Advisor, Holland Consulting, CUMU
avatar for Ted Howard

Ted Howard

President and Co-Founder, The Democracy Collaborative
avatar for Bobbie Laur

Bobbie Laur

Executive Director, CUMU Headquarters
In my role at Towson University, I manage a dynamic team and a diverse portfolio of projects that all focus on better connecting citizens and organizations with the resources of the university. We are focused on improving the quality of life and economic competitiveness for our r... Read More →
avatar for Andrew Seligsohn

Andrew Seligsohn

President, Campus Compact
Andrew J. Seligsohn is president of Campus Compact, a national coalition of 1100 colleges and universities dedicated to the public purposes of higher education.  As president, Seligsohn has focused on strengthening Campus Compact’s support for deep partnerships between campuses and communities through comprehensive campus... Read More →


Monday October 9, 2017 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Colorado Ballrooms

1:30pm

Leveraging your College’s/University’s Institutional Legacies to Strengthen Community Partnerships (30 mins)
When the current President was appointed in 2012, the College of Staten Island (CSI) was experiencing a disconnect from the surrounding community of Staten Island, NY. The absence of sustainable engagement created a void limiting the exchange of knowledge, skills, and values between the College and community. CSI embarked upon an ambitious campaign to reconnect with Staten Island by leveraging the College’s strong, but largely ignored or forgotten, legacies within the community. This initiative changed our institution resulting in greater educational opportunities for the community, expanded research opportunities and facilities for the College, increased funding for the institution, and more. Specifically, we focused upon the College’s:

Legacy of Institution - incorporating CSI’s predecessor institutions Staten Island Community College (1956-1993) and Richmond College (1967-1993) in the discourse and dialog of our history to successfully create greater connections with alumni and community members who were affiliated with these predecessor institutions.

Legacy of Place - remembering and honoring CSI’s current campus location as the former site of the infamous Willowbrook State School - which became the epicenter of the national disability civil rights movement to stop the institutionalization of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities - to successfully reengage the large disabilities community on Staten Island.

Legacy of Mission - embracing CSI’s original mission of access, opportunity, and excellence, dating back to the establishment of its first predecessor institution Staten Island Community College in 1956, to successfully create new initiatives to advance student academic success and social and economic mobility within the community.

Speakers
avatar for William J. Fritz

William J. Fritz

President, College of Staten Island/CUNY
avatar for Ken Iwama

Ken Iwama

VP of Economic Development, College of Staten Island/CUNY
As the Vice President of Economic Development, Continuing Studies and Government Relations, I support and enhance economic growth and sustainability through higher education opportunity, human capital and talent development, applied research and innovation, entrepreneurship and... Read More →


Monday October 9, 2017 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Colorado C

1:30pm

Press the Redo Button! Lessons Learned in Documenting Engagement Work (30 mins)
Urban universities generate a variety of valuable research and outreach activities including place-based community engaged work. The Robert. J. Jones Urban Outreach and Engagement Center (UROC) has been working to document the work of our place-based center. In approaching this work we discovered that how we measure the impact of place-based work is not always clear. However, over time, we have discovered some noteworthy approaches that guided us in the right direction.

This presentation describes five key lessons-learned in our work over time to document the engaged activities of UROC. 1) identify the levels of measurement in a logic model: input, output, outcome, impact. 2) Find an appropriate home to store the data that is flexible and sustainable. Through a partnership with the Office of Undergraduate Education, we tapped into the university enterprise system, Campus Labs. 3) Pilot(s) the means of gathering data to ensure collection of information actually needed. UROC collected data through short surveys, which all project leads complete annually. 4) Revisit levels of measurement often to inhibit the inclination to skip levels. With the first three levels in place, we are now working to identify UROC’s footprint in engaged activities. 5) Documentation can easily fall victim to other, more pressing needs. The work of documentation needs to have high-level oversight in order to keep the work moving.

Speakers
avatar for Heidi Barajas

Heidi Barajas

Associate Professor and Chair, OLPD, University of Minnesota
AT

Arien Telles

Graduate Research Assistant, UROC - University of Minnesota


Monday October 9, 2017 1:30pm - 2:00pm
Colorado B

1:30pm

Empowering (Future) Urban Educators to Teach in Linguistically Diverse Classrooms (45 mins)
The US has seen an unprecedented growth in the number of Emergent Bilinguals (EBs) enrolled in K-12 schools. Not surprising, the highest concentration of EBs are in urban areas.  This linguistic diversity offers teachers and students rich opportunities to expand worldviews, deepen understandings of culture and identity, and collaboratively develop language and academic knowledge.  To realize this potential, however, takes skills and resources that many mainstream teachers do not have.  Research shows that schools continue to struggle to meet the needs, much less foster the promise, of their multilingual students.

In 2011, Pennsylvania became one of only five states to mandate a stand-alone course be included in all teacher education programs, and currently more states are considering similar requirements.  In support of this effort, this workshop will share how a Philadelphia-based public College of Education, committed to preparing teachers to work in urban schools, has implemented this mandate – and how its transformed since inception. Specifically, I will address the questions, “What do non-ESL teachers need to know and be able to do to include EBs in content area classrooms?” And, “how can teacher educators develop these in a semester’s time?”  In this workshop, I will share the evolution of this required course from its initial design to what it is today, discuss the K-12 school partnerships and learning gained through the field component, and facilitate the exploration of state mandates related to EBs and how other urban universities are preparing teachers to lead linguistically and culturally diverse classrooms.

Speakers
TS

Tamara Sniad

Associate Professor, Temple University


Monday October 9, 2017 1:30pm - 2:15pm
Colorado D

1:30pm

What Can We Learn From the History of Urban Higher Education? (60 mins)
My recently completed book, Universities and Their Cities: Urban Higher Education in America will be released in May 2017 by Johns Hopkins University Press. It examines the changing ways colleges and universities in urban areas addressed widespread anti-urbanism in American higher education and how they engaged with their host cities. This history provides an important context for issues faced today by CUMU institutions. I will focus the conversation on:
• 1) the complex relationship between universities and the residents of surrounding neighborhoods regarding institutional expansion, urban renewal and issues of class and race.
• 2) How institutions can take advantage of the city for teaching and learning.
• 3) Their role in promoting academic programs in urban affairs.
• 4) How urban colleges and universities define their community service obligations.
• 5) They ways they address the needs of commuter, minority and immigrant students.
• 6)Their response to the traditional view that "urban universities" are low status institutions.
• 7) CUMU's role in addressing these matters.

Although my book is historical, I carry the story to the present. My perspective has been shaped not only by my training as an historian but by my ten years as chancellor and four years as arts and sciences dean of Rutgers University-Newark, my role in engaging the university in Newark's revitalization, and my presidency of CUMU in 2009/10 and board membership from  2005 TO 2011.

Speakers
avatar for Steven Diner

Steven Diner

University Professor, Rutgers University-Newark
I served as chancellor of Rutgers University-Newark from 2002 to 2012. In this leadership position I worked to take full advantage of the city's resources in teaching and research. I also greatly increased the services provided by the university to the city. And I served as presi... Read More →


Monday October 9, 2017 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Colorado H

1:30pm

Administrator-Scholars: Who We Are and How We Can Be Successful (60 mins)
Many who have completed doctoral degrees face the choice of becoming a faculty member or an administrator. In recent years, many new Ph.Ds were drawn to higher education because they are curious about how it can be improved, and that curiosity continues as they serve the university’s mission through administrative roles that are informed by intentional attention to relevant literature and original research. Administrator Scholars may or may not also hold active academic appointments that include teaching and research. Others conduct their administrative work through the lens of formal inquiry, research and discovery. Is this a trend in academic employment? What are the traits of an Administrator Scholar? How may this create new career paths? How will the practice and scholarly discoveries from such hybrid positions be disseminated and recognized?

Dr. Barbara Holland will moderate a panel of administrator scholars discussing these and other related issues. The discussion will inform the Holland Award for Administrator Scholars.

Speakers
avatar for Lina Dostilio

Lina Dostilio

Assistant Vice Chancellor, Community Engagement, University of Pittsburgh
avatar for Barbara Holland

Barbara Holland

Consultant and Strategy Advisor, Holland Consulting, CUMU
avatar for Valerie Holton

Valerie Holton

Executive Editor, Senior Fellow, CUMU
Valerie Holton, PhD, LCSW is the executive editor of CUMU’s Metropolitan Universities (MUJ), a quarterly online journal for scholarship on cutting-edge issues impacting urban and metropolitan universities and colleges. Additionally, in her role as CUMU’s Senior Fellow, Valeri... Read More →
avatar for Emily Janke

Emily Janke

Dir, Institute for Community & Economic Engagement, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
institutionalizing community engagement | tracking and measuring community engagement across an institution or system | recognizing community engagement in promotion and tenure | community-university partnerships


Monday October 9, 2017 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Colorado G

1:30pm

Challenges and Progress in Addressing our Urban Imperative (60 mins)
Buffalo State has a long history of community engagement and has recently reaffirmed its responsibility as an anchor institution in the city of Buffalo as evidenced in both the campus’ recently adopted strategic plan and the collaboration with five other institutions of higher education to develop an anchor institution dashboard. This presentation will focus on the challenges encountered and progress made in addressing what we see as an urban imperative. We will describe how a guiding philosophy of engagement in urban settings with a guiding principle of partnership reciprocity has become manifest across the institution. We will deconstruct the complex and challenging process of translating the philosophy into a plan of action for all sectors of the institution in a manner that results in systemic change. Presenters will explore the role of key community stakeholders, the inevitable expansion of partnerships, the role of long-term relationships that require a continuum of initiatives, and balancing the endless demands of a commitment in times of finite resources.

Speakers
avatar for Katherine Conway-Turner

Katherine Conway-Turner

President, Buffalo State College
Katherine S. Conway-Turner, Ph.D., began her tenure as the ninth president of Buffalo State College on August 3, 2014. Her professional leadership can be seen in the many and varied aspects that are part of a major academic anchor institution. As president of SUNY’s largest and... Read More →
avatar for Kathy Doody

Kathy Doody

Assistant Professor, SUNY, Buffalo State College
I am the coordinator of the Exceptional Education Early Childhood (B-2) Students with Disabilities Program. This graduate program prepares pre-service and in-service teachers to work with young children with disabilities. My research interests center around autism spectrum diso... Read More →
JH

Jevon Hunter

Woods Beals Endowed Chair for Urban Education, The State University of New York, Buffalo State
Jevon D. Hunter is the Woods Beals Endowed Chair for Urban Education in the School of Education and an Associate Professor in the Elementary Education and Reading Department at The State University New York, Buffalo State where his teaching and research interests examine the ways... Read More →
JS

John Siskar

Ar Advisor for Educational Pipeline Initiatives, SUNY Buffalo State


Monday October 9, 2017 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Colorado A

1:30pm

Community Engaged Learning Panel (60 mins)
A diverse urban community provides an ideal real-world learning lab for students.  This panel of faculty and community agencies will talk about the process of developing community-based learning experiences through service learning, internships, research and alternative break projects. The goal of these projects is to introduce students to the complexity of community needs and encourage students to become engaged members of society. Community-engaged learning also has a positive impact on retention and student success.  Topics for the panel include: 
 
• how faculty and community agencies find each other
• how to create projects that are useful to the agency and are also learning experiences for students
• how the university can help and support these endeavors
• how to manage the relationship between the university and community agency
• how to deal with logistics and liability issues
• how these projects have enhanced student success and university reputation

Speakers
DD

Diana Delgado

MSU Denver
RE

Rhonda Eaker

Director, Applied Learning Center, MSUDenver
BF

Bethany Fleck

Associate Professor of Psychology, Metropolitan State University of Denver
KH

Kevin Hammons

MSU Denver
avatar for Lori McKinney

Lori McKinney

Service Learning Specialist, Metropolitan State University of Denver [118924]
Service Learning, Civic Engagement, Civic Education, Civic Health Network, Civic Canopy, Colorado Service Learning Council, Engaged Faculty Institute, Networking
AS

Alaina Shires

Reading Partners
AT

Ashley Turner

American Red Cross


Monday October 9, 2017 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Denver 6

1:30pm

The Role of a Research University in Addressing Urban Issues (60 mins)
The United Nations projects that nearly two-thirds of the world’s population will be living in cities by 2050. While this influx of new residents brings with it a rich tapestry of diverse ideas and cultures, it also creates significant challenges for metropolitan areas. Urban research universities serve as valuable assets as cities tackle the issues that come with urban growth.

The University of Colorado Denver, Colorado’s only public urban research university, works closely with civic, business and government entities to help address the concerns facing the city of Denver. Ranked the #1 Best Place to Live by US News and World Reports in 2016, Denver is enjoying an economic and cultural boom. But it also faces challenges ranging from affordable housing to homelessness to health disparities.

A panel of CU Denver faculty members share highlights of their research and how their work helps the city take on these thorny issues.

Speakers
avatar for Antwan Jefferson

Antwan Jefferson

Clinical Assistant Professor, University of Colorado Denver
I am interested in the relationships between local families/community members and educational institutions, including PK-12 schools and colleges/universities. As a Clinical Assistant Professor in the School of Education and Human Development, I instruct courses focused on social... Read More →
avatar for Wes Marshall

Wes Marshall

Associate Professor, University of Colorado Denver
avatar for Michael Seman

Michael Seman

University of Colorado Denver
Michael Seman is Director of Creative Industries Research and Policy at the University of Colorado Denver College of Arts and Media. He received his doctorate in urban planning and public policy from the University of Texas at Arlington in 2014 and his work primarily examines the... Read More →
avatar for Esther Sullivan

Esther Sullivan

Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Colorado Denver


Monday October 9, 2017 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Colorado J

1:30pm

Utilizing a Civic Action Plan to Improve the Welfare of a Neighborhood (60 mins)
Addressing the needs of a central city neighborhood with 19% of the residents living in poverty and substandard housing is a daunting task. Through the civic action planning model developed by Campus Compact the Ogden Civic Action Network has come together to take on this challenge. This place-based, anchor-ally-resident approach has three areas of focus: health, education and housing. The creative use of an existing foundation and the organizational structure will be described. The many challenges and opportunities with such an effort will be shared by the leaders of the three implementation teams, all of whom are participating as panelists.

The moderator of the session will ask the following questions of the panelists:
1. What is your involvement in the Ogden Civic Action Network (OgdenCAN) and why have you chosen to play a leadership role within it?
2. Why does your organization participate in the network and what role does in play in bringing the civic action plan to fruition?
3. What challenges and opportunities have you and your team identified in developing and implementing the civic action plan?
4. If you had to name one key element contributing to the success of the civic action plan, what would that be and why?
5. What advice do you have for cities, organizations and institutions of higher education interested in producing a civic action plan collaboratively?
6. How will you know if the plan succeeds?

The moderator will leave time for the audience to also ask questions of the panelists.

Speakers
BB

Brian Bennion

Health Officer, Weber-Morgan Health Department
AC

Angela Choberka

Assist. Director, Ogden United PN, United Way of Northern Utah
BC

Bill Cook

Community Partner, Weber State University
MY

Melissa Yack Hall

Executive Director, Weber State University Center for Community Engaged Learning
BK

Brenda Kowalewski

Associate Provost, Weber State University
CM

Carrie Maxson

ACCESS and Accountability Supervisor, Ogden School District


Monday October 9, 2017 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Colorado I

2:00pm

The Newark Business Hub: A Program Elevating Media, Art and Entertainment Industry Entrepreneurs for Economic Impact (30 mins)
Visual and performing artists, bloggers and digital media experts, film makers and producers, photographers and videographers…

These creative individuals have long been recognized as the visionary first movers and narrative-changers on the leading edge of urban community revitalization. They are entrepreneurial, but many often operate fledgling firms and survive job to job as freelancers. This session will share an example of how urban and metropolitan universities can launch a business education program to help local creative entrepreneurs survive and grow. Session participants will hear about the socioeconomic goals and the knowledge-based training, experiential learning and peer mentorship components of the Newark Business Hub, developed by the Center for Urban Entrepreneurship and Economic Development at Rutgers University. Finally, the session will highlight a key component of the Newark Business Hub program – unapologetically facilitating access for entrepreneurs to the space, equipment and resources of a newly opened university operated “third space” expressly designed to contribute to the local economy and provide diverse opportunities for individuals to experience and participate in the arts and generate publicly engaged scholarship.

Speakers
avatar for Lyneir Richardson

Lyneir Richardson

Executive Director, Rutgers University Center for Urban Entrepreneurship & Economic Development (CUE
Cool things happening at Rutgers University -Newark. | Urban Economic Development | Creative Industry Entrepreneurs (film makers, performing artist, photographers, etc.)


Monday October 9, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Colorado B

2:00pm

Using Research to Stimulate Community Conversations about Rebound Neighborhoods (30 mins)
For the past three years, Creating Whole Communities, an initiative of the University of Missouri St. Louis and University of Missouri Extension, has sponsored a series of community forums called “What’s Brewing?” Research on neighborhood trends in the St. Louis metropolitan area from 1970 to the present has been used to frame these community conversations. We focus on “rebound neighborhoods” – communities that the data shows have come back from urban decline. After a short data presentation, local activists tell the story of their neighborhood. Held at 7:30 am, over more than a dozen forums we have attracted between 40 and 80 people to a lively community conversation about what works (and what doesn’t work) in community revitalization.

Speakers
KG

Karl Guenther

Community Development Specialist, University of Missouri - St. Louis
TS

Todd Swanstrom

Professor, University of Missouri-St. Louis


Monday October 9, 2017 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Colorado C

2:45pm

Expressing Language Through International Relationships and Urban Community Partners (30 mins)
The word “Immigrant” is saddled with negative connotations as they continue to flood into the U.S. relocating in various cities across the nation. In 1990, Nebraska predicted a 14.4 % minority ratio by the year 2025 (DHHS 2009) – however, it reached 14.6 % in 2005 – exceeding the anticipated percentage twenty years ahead of its projected date. The growth of immigration will not decrease as we continue to see more minority children in public schools. Thus the need to educate the children and family will rise and public schools will become a necessary haven for the non-native speakers.
Using P-16 Service Learning components as part of the language curriculum is beneficial to bridging relationships in the urban community as students of immigrants’ partner with international university students and a non-profit organization. As a result, students will begin to feel comfortable in an unfamiliar community as they improve their language skills during the partnership. This connection provides resources to the culturally diverse students that will enhance learning about their new world and allow them to see future possibilities, like attending college in the U.S.
We will discuss how Service Learning has become a vehicle that has impacted elementary ELL students culturally, academically, and personally. There are many success stories that have risen out of a having Service Learning as a component of an educational curriculum that we would like to share with the urban community. Though Service Learning is still an experiential method of teaching, our results have been successful.

Speakers
AC

Angie Carlton

Service Learning Associate, University of Nebraska Omaha Service Learning Academy
avatar for Linda Loftus

Linda Loftus

ESL Specialist, University of Nebraska Omaha


Monday October 9, 2017 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Colorado A

2:45pm

Sustaining Transformative University-City Government Partnerships (30 mins)
This session will discuss key factors in sustaining a successful university-city partnership over a 15 year period. Perspectives will be provided from the City and from the University.

Achieving a mutually beneficial and transformative partnership between a university and a city government is challenging but rewarding. Sustaining the relationship then becomes the challenge given inevitable leadership and executive changes and economic and environmental factors. Most thriving partnerships also have both formal and informal interaction at many levels of the organization. These multiple points of contact and the decentralized nature of universities must be taken into account in any strategy to support the partnership.

Speakers
avatar for Joanne Curry

Joanne Curry

Vice-President, External Relations, Simon Fraser University
DJ

Donna Jones

GM, Investment & Intergovernmental Relations, City of Surrey


Monday October 9, 2017 2:45pm - 3:15pm
Colorado B

2:45pm

Exploring the University’s Role in Collective Impact (45 mins)
As anchor institutions, urban Universities are uniquely positioned in their local communities to influence the economy, support community organizations, and be a change agent in combating social issues in their geographical area. For organizations with a mission to improve the community, collective impact may be the best way to maximize the effects of that influence. Collective impact describes an effective form of inter-organizational collaboration in which multiple organizations with the same mission align their activities and goals in order to more efficiently mitigate social and economic problems. How valuable is this kind of approach? What do Universities need to know about collective impact? University members who are dedicated to or interested in community engagement and want to know more about collective impact should attend. This interactive workshop will include small group discussions prompted by the presenters, including the editor of a forthcoming special issue in the Metropolitan Universities Journal concerning collective impact. University and faculty members have opportunities to become involved in collective impact efforts either as a partner or as a backbone organization, and we will discuss the benefits of both.

Speakers
avatar for Joseph Allen

Joseph Allen

Associate Professor, University of Nebraska at Omaha
avatar for Kelly Prange

Kelly Prange

Doctoral Candidate, University of Nebraska at Omaha
ST

Sheridan Trent

Graduate Assistant, University of Nebraska at Omaha



Monday October 9, 2017 2:45pm - 3:30pm
Colorado G

2:45pm

Strategic Community Engagement Planning: Designing a Process for Center Leadership on Engagement (45 mins)
This workshop will present a case study of the recent strategic planning process at Brown University’s Swearer Center (2015-2016) as an example of a process design for center leadership on engagement. The first half of the session will introduce the challenges that were facing the center and our community partners in Providence, RI. The session will present our engaged scholarship initiatives and strategic shift to implement scaffolded, developmental, long term, intensive community engagement that builds capacity for our partners and helps us forge sustainable community partnerships. The workshop will also cover our efforts to expand the boundaries of our student experience beyond Brown through experiential learning, research, and leadership programs, and our work to improve diversity and inclusion. We will present the types of input we received from partners and stakeholders, and the process through which we designed our strategic plan.

The second half of the workshop will cover lessons learned in implementing our strategic plan in its first year. Examples include establishing a community partnership team, integrating rigorous academic components throughout our programming, engaging faculty and students in sustainable relationships with community partners, and the importance of collecting data for strategic community engagement both from our students and community partners. In our cyclical planning process we incorporate input and recommendations from the NASCE toolkit to best inform our programming, track our community involvement, improve our student and faculty engagement infrastructure, address obstacles to engagement as cited by our stakeholders, and most importantly, measure our progress vis-a-vis our strategic objectives.

Speakers
MJ

Mathew Johnson

Director, Associate Dean, Swearer Center for Public Service, Brown University
avatar for Georgina Manok

Georgina Manok

Manager, Research & Assessment, Swearer Center, Brown University


Monday October 9, 2017 2:45pm - 3:30pm
Colorado H

2:45pm

Using our Urban Advantage to Recruit and Retain Diverse Teachers (45 mins)
For over a decade, the teacher education department at an urban institution partnered with its neighboring, urban P-12 school districts. The partnerships were successful for many, but the race, ethnicity, and gender of the teacher candidates remained the same. The result was missed opportunities for the university to live its mission of recruiting and retaining a diverse body of teacher candidates and for the P-12 districts to have an active voice in preparing future teachers. Although the partnerships had at one time been successful, it was now falling short of expectations for both the university and P-12 districts.

The department launched a program revision which (a) created a strategic partnership with dual enrollment teachers, (b) restructured how teacher candidates learned about student culture in the communities in which they completed their practicums, (c) shifted one-third of all course work from university classrooms into P-12 urban classrooms, (d) made field experiences consequential, (e) placed university faculty in P-12 schools, and (f) provided instructional coaches for teacher candidates.

The workshop will address (a) internal and external barriers encountered by the department as it initiated and then worked to sustain the new recruitment and retention plan, (b) expected and unexpected outcomes, and c) data from two years of implementation. The ultimate question - has the promise of increasing the diverse pool of teacher candidates been reached – will be the focus of the presentation.

Speakers
NE

Nancy Edick

Dean of the College of Education, University of Nebraska Omaha
SE

Sarah Edwards

Professor, Chair of Teacher Education, University of Nebraska Omaha


Monday October 9, 2017 2:45pm - 3:30pm
Denver 6

2:45pm

Equity in Theory and Equity in Practice (90 mins)
Annually the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) publishes a report on student participation in high impact practices and breaks down participation across such characteristics as race/ethnicity and first generation status. Research has shown that student engagement in high impact practices such as civic engagement and service learning has significant impact on students and can be “life changing” (Kuh 2008) especially for underserved students of color who have shown greater academic gains after participation in such activities. Do we use this NSSE data in our work? As the number of students of color increases on college campuses, do we ask ourselves is access to and participation in our civic engagement activities equitable across underrepresented groups, particularly racial-ethnic groups? Do we monitor equity in our engagement efforts or take into consideration the particular impact on or perspective of underrepresented students as they engage in the community, especially considering many of our institutions are located in communities where people of color are the majority. In this conversation we will use a critical lens to discuss equity in our engagement efforts, exploring these questions not simply from the perspective of our students, but examining the role of staffing and leadership in engagement initiatives and the impact on conversations of access and equity.

Speakers
avatar for Nyeema Watson

Nyeema Watson

Associate Chancellor for Civic Engagement, Rutgers University--Camden


Monday October 9, 2017 2:45pm - 4:15pm
Colorado I

2:45pm

Presidential Leadership, Transition and Succession (90 mins)
This panel will discuss the underlying issues and challenges involved in leadership transition and succession and their relationship in sustaining the institutional civic mission practices and commitments. The panel represents a wide variety of leadership perspectives, namely, the board of trustees, the presidencies at a regional public, traditional private liberal arts and small/moderate sized comprehensive institutions. The panel will address issues of transition and succession in these different areas as well as sustainability of civic commitments, practices and local partnerships.

Speakers
RC

Rebecca Chopp

Chancellor, University of Denver
JC

John Christensen

Chancellor Emeritus, University of Nebraska at Omaha
RG

Richard Guarasci

President, Wagner College
avatar for Bill Howard

Bill Howard

Vice President and Senior Consultant, Academic Search, Inc.
Mr. Howard joined Academic Search as Vice President and Senior Consultant in June of 2015, after serving most recently as a Senior Vice Chancellor for the State University of New York system administration for four years. Mr. Howard has over 30 years of experience in higher e... Read More →
avatar for Maureen Zupan

Maureen Zupan

Honorary Trustee and Former Chair of the Board, Hobart and William Smith Colleges


Monday October 9, 2017 2:45pm - 4:15pm
Colorado C

2:45pm

We love our University partners, but sometimes they drive us crazy (90 mins)
For many years we who pursue community engagement have discussed our challenges to doing this work and our responses--as well as the successes and failures of those efforts. Challenges often focus on both our internal processes and the difference in perspective of our college/university community and our community at large. This presentation turns the tables on the "usual" CUMU session. In this panel, community partners from several different communities will present on the "joys and frustrations" of working together with a College/University partner (four partner institutions will be represented). What they learned about the difference between the academic culture and the structure and functioning of their own community organizations. Representatives from the for-profit, non-profit, and educational sectors will discuss the unique challenges faced by community partners in each of those areas. As with all of our work, the intent is to open dialogues and create greater understanding between university and community partners. We invite thoughtful discussion from all in attendance.

Speakers
KC

Kevin Corcoran

Dean, College of Arts & Science, Oakland University
avatar for Tim Gannon

Tim Gannon

Supervisor Support Program Intervenor, New York City Department of Education
SG

Scott Gladney

SpringHill Suites Denver Downtown
H

HeikeL

Manager of Possibilities, University of Nebraska at Omaha
JH

John Heyliger

Lockheed Martin
TK

Thomas Kimble

Community liaison, City of Pontiac
MW

Maggie Wood

Executive Director, Inclusive Communities


Monday October 9, 2017 2:45pm - 4:15pm
Colorado J

3:30pm

The National Assessment of Service and Community Engagement: An Ecosystem of Tools to Measure Community Engagement of Students, Faculty & Institutions (45 mins)
This workshop will introduce the toolkits of the National Assessment for Service and Community Engagement (NASCE). The NASCE toolkit offers invaluable data and insights to participating institutions through surveys and reports that measure community engagement across students, faculty, and staff. The toolkit identifies primary avenues through which universities engage with their communities through collecting data on the breadth and depth of community engagement, and gauges attitudes towards institutional investment in engagement through infrastructure, programming, and outreach. It provides a quantitative analysis of student and faculty-reported service behavior/attitudes, and assesses perceptions of, motivations for, and obstacles to community service.

The workshop will present the NASCE tools that are easily customizable to meet institution’s individual needs. At the same time, these tools offer a comparative perspective to measure institutional performance vis-à-vis a national sample of over 80 institutions and 57,000 students that participated in our surveys.
Research supports that a better understanding of student engagement helps schools create and tailor learning opportunities and outcomes for their students. Campuses nationwide are looking for ways to assess the performance of their community engagement initiatives. The NASCE workshop will provide participants with options and examples of how to incorporate our customizable tools into their institutions’ strategic planning and self-assessment processes to develop an evidence-driven approach to strategically advance their community engagement and better engage students, faculty and staff in their ongoing initiatives with the communities they serve.

Speakers
AA

April A. Backus

Siena College Research Institute
MJ

Mathew Johnson

Director, Associate Dean, Swearer Center for Public Service, Brown University
avatar for Georgina Manok

Georgina Manok

Manager, Research & Assessment, Swearer Center, Brown University


Monday October 9, 2017 3:30pm - 4:15pm
Colorado H

3:30pm

Deliberative Pedagogy: What, Why, and How for Engaged Teaching and Learning in Urban Contexts (60 mins)
In contested spaces across the globe, a new model of teaching and learning is emerging in higher education. This approach goes well beyond the old, passive instructional paradigm that asks students to be consumers of their education, instead creating space for participants to be co-creators of their own learning through deliberative conversations. It also goes beyond the “active learning” strategies that have become more robust in recent years.

More recently, scholars concerned with engaged pedagogies have articulated nuanced dynamics of what it means to approach academic content, students, and communities through more collaborative, participatory, and democratic approaches. An essential part of engaged pedagogy is participatory educational practices such as “high-impact practices” for student learning. These engaged learning practices include curricular interventions (e.g., first-year seminars, capstone courses, global learning); student life experiences (common intellectual experiences and learning communities); off-campus engagement (internships, service-learning courses); and classroom practices (intensive writing, undergraduate research, collaborative assignments).

This session will provide participants with the opportunity to learn about deliberative pedagogies and how they might alter their courses to bring in deliberative approaches. Building upon Deliberative Pedagogy: Teaching the Learning for Democratic Engagement (Michigan State University Press, 2017), the conversation offers an opportunity for participants to learn about the ways that deliberation has been integrated into teaching and community engagement, and highlight different approaches to engaging students and community members in meaningful dialogue and deliberation about public problems. Participants will design site-specific dialogue/deliberation pedagogical approaches and projects to take back to their own classrooms, campuses, and communities.

Speakers
NL

Nick Longo

Providence College
avatar for Timothy Shaffer

Timothy Shaffer

Assistant Professor, Kansas State University


Monday October 9, 2017 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Colorado D

3:30pm

It’s Not About 'Us': Express Newark Prioritizing the Public Good (60 mins)
Publicly engaged scholarship demands new ways of working within and without the academy.

Systems within the university reward faculty for individual achievements. This approach militates against working on collaborative projects because of the difficulty of explaining and quantifying one’s contribution. The culture of academia further inhibits potential collaborations and undermines even the most altruistic faculty, who are socialized to devalue the experiential, place-based knowledge of a community partner and encouraged to adopt a self-concept as “the” authority.

But if universities are to honor their commitment to the public good, the public must be prioritized in the academic value system, which ought to encourage new modes of thinking that recognize the legitimacy of the expertise of community partners and place value on collaboration with them.

From the community perspective, there is often a lack of models for successful collaboration, with engagement by universities more often than not taking the form of exercising eminent domain or parachuting in to “fix” a problem and then abandoning the community. Community members carry with them skepticism that the university’s only use is as a source of hand-outs rather than a source of the kind of agency afforded by true collaboration.

On this panel we will examine the question: What role can university leaders play in supporting faculty who are interested in publicly engaged scholarship and in building trusting relationships with community members?

Speakers
VD

Victor Davson

Co-Director, Express Newark, Rutgers University-Newark
AS

Anne Schaper Englot

Rutgers University–Newark
avatar for Chantal Fischzang

Chantal Fischzang

Assistant Professor, Rutgers University-Newark
avatar for Tamara Fleming

Tamara Fleming

Photographer & Creative Director, Rutgers University-Newark
NK

Nick Kline

Associate Professor, Rutgers University-Newark


Monday October 9, 2017 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Colorado G

3:30pm

Launching a Community School Model and the Role of Community Collaboration (60 mins)
The panel discussion Launching a Community School Model and the Role of Community Collaboration will include speakers from diverse backgrounds ranging from universities, nonprofits and school districts. The panel members from Drexel University will discuss their case study research in Pennsylvania and findings they have made regarding the establishment and maintenance of community schools, as well as the role they have chosen to play as university researchers in advancing the community school model. They will also discuss how other universities have been involved with community school models. Additionally, the panel will examine how the Community School Model addresses issues such as undocumented students and support for refugees and immigrants, dropout prevention, and college and career readiness.

Speakers
SG

Shelly Grim

Communities In Schools of Pennsylvania
BL

Bruce Levine

Associate Clinical Professor, Drexel University
EL

Erin Long

Community School Coalition/Communities In Schools of Pennsylvania
avatar for Kathleen Provinzano

Kathleen Provinzano

Assistant Professor, Drexel University
Kathleen is an Assistant Professor in the Educational Administration program. She is an experienced school administrator, school counselor, and social studies teacher. Her active Pennsylvania Department of Education certificates include Superintendent of Schools, K-12 Principal... Read More →
avatar for Ryan Riley

Ryan Riley

President & State Director, Communities In Schools Pennsylvania
Ryan serves as the President and State Director of Communities In Schools of Pennsylvania. Ryan leads and supports an affiliate network, which employees more than 200 staff and serves more than 45,000 students with the goal of improving student outcomes and reducing high school d... Read More →


Monday October 9, 2017 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Colorado B

3:30pm

Moving Beyond Stage 1: A Multi Year Partnership Among Anchor Institutions for College Readiness (60 mins)
The 30,000 Degrees initiative brings together a private, practical liberal arts college, the branch campus of a major metropolitan Catholic university, and the public university system of New York City, to increase the number of baccalaureate degree graduates by 30,000 between 2015-2025 within their shared geographic region in Staten Island, NY. Inspired by 55,000 Degrees, this collaboration between Wagner College, St. John’s University/Staten Island Campus, and the College of Staten Island/CUNY was shaped by the 2013 CUMU conference in Louisville. 30,000 Degrees uses a neighborhood model to fill the gaps within Pre-K–16 pipelines as a means of increasing student success and college completion. This initiative builds upon the existing assets and cross-sectoral community network of each Pre-K–16 anchor institution to: 1) better understand the needs of our target students, families, and schools, and 2) to align programs and resources within the pipeline for mutually beneficial, authentic collaborations. Following the 2015 CUMU Engagement Academy and Conference in Omaha, efforts to institutionalize 30,000 Degrees were enhanced with strategies to leverage the legacy of each campus in relation to the shared objectives with each pipeline. The outcome has helped to:
• Improve urban teacher preparation, practicum internship placements, and civic engagement programs
• Increase credit-bearing courses as well as opportunities for entrepreneurship and workforce development for high school students
• Create unique, evidence-based cohort models at the high school and middle school level, which align school and student needs with collaborative faculty research opportunities and the strategic vision of each campus community

Speakers
ME

Mark Erlenwein

Principal, Staten Island Technical High School
avatar for Tim Gannon

Tim Gannon

Supervisor Support Program Intervenor, New York City Department of Education
avatar for Ken Iwama

Ken Iwama

VP of Economic Development, College of Staten Island/CUNY
As the Vice President of Economic Development, Continuing Studies and Government Relations, I support and enhance economic growth and sustainability through higher education opportunity, human capital and talent development, applied research and innovation, entrepreneurship and... Read More →
NM

Nicholas Mele

Principal, Edwin Markham Intermediate School 51
avatar for Crystal Montalvo

Crystal Montalvo

Executive Director, 30,000 Degrees
Crystal Vera-Montalvo joined the 30,000 Degrees: College Readiness for a Stronger Staten Islandcoalition in 2015 as the partnership’s first Program Manager. Leading a cross-sectoral effort to align community-based resources, and the intellectual capital of our local higher education institutions to the pre-school through college pipeline, Crystal brings a diverse range of civic professional experience to this collaboration. Prior to this role, she directed college civic engagement programs, local public health and development campaigns, and school to community partnerships. With a... Read More →


Monday October 9, 2017 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Colorado A

3:30pm

Transformation Through Education: A BA Degree for Incarcerated and Formerly Incarcerated Students (60 mins)
This conversational and candid discussion will explore how a public university has come to partner with the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation in order to provide educational opportunities for the incarcerated and formerly incarcerated. Cal State LA is the only university in the state of California to offer a BA degree within a state prison. We discuss the experiences and challenges of working across major bureaucracies to provide a transformative education. We will also discuss the challenges of matriculating formerly incarcerated students on to a university campus.

Speakers
JB

John Bae

Program Associate, Vera Institute
John Bae is a program associate at the Vera Institute of Justice (Vera) in the Center on Sentencing and Corrections (CSC). He works on Vera’s public housing projects, the Expanding Access to Postsecondary Education (EAPSE) project, and the Renewing Communities initiative. For the public housing work, he provides technical assistance to public housing authorities that are implementing reentry programs and/or revising admissions policies for formerly incarcerated people. For EAPSE, he provides technical assistance to stakeholders that are implementing college-in-prison programs or developing reentry supports for formerly incarcerated students in California, Florida, Oregon, and Washington. Finally, he serves as the program lead for the evaluation of Renewing Communities, a California initiative funding college-in-prison programs and reentry programs for formerly incarcerated people. Before joining Vera, John worked as a program coordinator for College Initiative, where he led a team to provide resources and support for formerly incarcerated college students. John holds a BA and an MA in Criminal Justice from CUNY John Jay College of Criminal Justice, and currently teaches courses in corrections at CUNY Borough of Manhattan Community... Read More →
avatar for Brant Choate

Brant Choate

Superintendent, Education, CDCR
Brant  Choate has 26 years’ experience working in the field of educational administration.  Since 2003, he has worked in the field of adult education managing both California adult schools as well as university programs.  He was the Director of Inmate Education for the Los Angeles County... Read More →
avatar for Taffany Lim

Taffany Lim

Senior Director, Cal State LA
Cal State LA operates the only in-custody BA program for the incarcerated in the state of California. It is a partnership with the California Department of Corrections & Rehabilitation and the Vera Institute. | Taffany Lim is the Senior Director of the Center for Engagement, Se... Read More →



Monday October 9, 2017 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Denver 6

5:00pm

Welcome Reception, hosted by MSU Denver
Kick-off CUMU by joining MSU Denver at their Hotel and Hospitality Learning Center—an on-campus, full-service learning laboratory—for an evening reception and learn how a public/private partnership is supporting Colorado’s growing hospitality industry.

Enjoy drinks and hors d’oeuvres in the lobby of the SpringHill Suites Denver Downtown with opening remarks from incoming MSU Denver President Janine Davidson. Then head out in small groups for faculty-led tours of the Hotel and Hospitality Learning Center that includes the 150-room hotel, a 72-seat student-run restaurant, light sensory analysis lab for wine, and demonstration theater and labs. Along the way, sample food prepared by students, enjoy beer from the on-site brewery, and a wine tasting with faculty.

Monday October 9, 2017 5:00pm - 7:00pm
SpringHill Suite Denver Downtown 1190 Auraria Pkwy, Denver, CO 80204

7:00pm

President's Dinner (invite only)
Hosted by University of Denver Chancellor Rebecca Chopp, Metropolitan State University of Denver President Janine Davidson, and University of Colorado Denver Chancellor Dorothy Horrell.

Monday October 9, 2017 7:00pm - 9:00pm
TBA
 
Tuesday, October 10
 

7:30am

Breakfast Buffet
Tuesday October 10, 2017 7:30am - 9:00am
Colorado Ballrooms

7:30am

Registration
Tuesday October 10, 2017 7:30am - 5:00pm
Colorado Ballrooms

9:00am

President's Breakfast with Denver Mayor Michael B. Hancock

Welcome remarks provided by CUMU President Tom George. The Ernest A. Lynton Award for the Scholarship of Engagement for Early Career Faculty presented. Denver Mayor Michael Hancock introduced by CUMU President Emeritus Richard Guarasaci. 


The role of higher ed in a great urban city


The city of Denver is flourishing amid economic growth and an influx of millennials who contribute to the vitality of the city. U.S. News & World Report has named Denver the best place to live in America. It’s also been named the third most popular destination for millennials and the best place for business and careers. What is the role of urban universities in the success of Denver or any major city? 


 


Speakers
TG

Tom George

Chancellor, University of Missouri-St. Louis
RG

Richard Guarasci

President, Wagner College
avatar for Michael B. Hancock

Michael B. Hancock

Mayor of Denver
MICHAEL B. HANCOCK is Denver's 45th mayor. During his time in office, Mayor Hancock and his administration have eliminated the city’s budget deficit, fostered a diverse economy and restored much needed services that were lost during the recession. With a drive toward increasing opportunity for every resident, he has prioritized innovative solutions to investing in the... Read More →
MJ

Mathew Johnson

Director, Associate Dean, Swearer Center for Public Service, Brown University
EW

Elaine Ward

Visiting Scholar and Lynton Award Coordinator, Merrimack College


Tuesday October 10, 2017 9:00am - 10:00am
Colorado Ballrooms

10:15am

Matching academic offerings, facility construction, and industry needs (30 mins)
MSU Denver has been preparing students to become part of Colorado’s urban workforce for over fifty years. The Aerospace Engineering Sciences Building is a true partnership with Colorado’s industry leaders in advanced manufacturing and aerospace. Not only did the University engage industry in the programming and design of the labs, but also in building the curriculum for its new Advanced Manufacturing Sciences Institute. This facility and the curriculum being taught through the institute will be a “game changer” for manufacturing in Colorado because it provides flexible maker-spaces that encourage iterative, changing interaction between students, faculty, and industry essential in an evolving economy. Nurturing such places for collaboration fosters self-sustaining curriculum enrichment. In this session, we present a tangible case study of partnership between higher education, local civic leadership, and industry that demonstrate the inherent project opportunities from strategic visioning, conceptualization and financing through design and construction.

Speakers
SH

Sandra Haynes

Deputy Provost, MSU Denver
EH

Erin HIllhouse

Senior Associate, Anderson Mason Dale Architects


Tuesday October 10, 2017 10:15am - 10:45am
Colorado J

10:15am

Creating a Successful Community Engagement Enterprise (45 mins)
IPFW, in fulfilling its mission to educate the citizens and enhance the quality of life in the northeast Indiana region, has a vision to enhance the connectivity between the campus and the community to drive positive outcomes in economic, workforce and community development. Following its recognition as a “Carnegie Engaged University”, the campus launched the “C2C – Campus to Community Connections” initiative to promote collaborations with regional industry to facilitate the growth of high-skill and high-wage jobs, while better connecting our students to opportunities that are created as a result.

The Office of Engagement actively facilitates university collaborations between regional companies, government and community organizations and its faculty and students. By providing a single office for industry partners to engage with faculty and students, through such vehicles as the Center for Applied Mathematics and Center of Excellence in Systems Engineering, companies and community groups regularly access research capabilities, technical assistance, training, service learning and student hiring opportunities in a convenient and cost-effective manner.

The “C2C – Campus to Community Connections” program enables local, regional and statewide organizations to engage with the IPFW campus, as well as access Purdue system-wide capabilities such as the Manufacturing Extension Partnership, Technical Assistance Program and the Indiana Advanced Manufacturing Competitiveness Center. With the organization of the various community engagement offices into a single portal with a recognizable brand, C2C is providing a gateway for our community partners to connect with the appropriate resources based upon their needs.

Speakers
DC

David Cochran

Associate Professor of Systems Engineering, Purdue University Fort Wayne
PD

Peter Dragnev

Professor and Chair, Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne
avatar for Sean Ryan

Sean Ryan

Director, Office of Engagement, Indiana University Purdue University Fort Wayne (IPFW)
The IPFW Office of Engagement was jointly created by IPFW, Purdue University, Indiana University, and the northeast Indiana business community in 2005. The office serves as a community partner in key regional economic development, strategic planning and workforce development ini... Read More →


Tuesday October 10, 2017 10:15am - 11:00am
Colorado I

10:15am

Demonstrating the Impact of Community Engagement: Realistic and Doable Strategies for Success (45 mins)
Most campuses are eager to answer questions like “How are students, faculty, and staff on campus working to address civic issues and public problems?”, “To what extent is our engagement making a difference?”, “How can we better support community engagement?” Discover how to track, monitor, assess, and evaluate community-engaged activities, which include curricular, co-curricular, or project-based activities that are done in partnership with the community, in order to tell a more comprehensive story of engagement. Whether you’re interested in community outcomes, student outcomes, partnership assessment, or faculty/staff engagement, campuses confront an array of challenges when trying to combine and align these questions into a comprehensive assessment plan. This session will give participants tools, strategies, and information to design, initiate and/or enhance a systematic mechanism for monitoring and assessment of community-engaged activities.

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Keyne

Lisa Keyne

Chief Strategy Officer, Collaboratory, Treetop Commons, LLC
I am happy to talk with you about Collaboratory, our software that can help you organize all community engagement and public service activities across your institution.
avatar for Kristin Medlin

Kristin Medlin

Assistant Director for Postsecondary Initiatives, Treetop Commons, LLC
Kristin Medlin is the Assistant Director for Postsecondary Initiatives at TreeTop Commons, LLC. She is a co-designer of the Collaboratory, a cloud-based software application for higher education that helps institutions monitor and measure their institutional community engagement... Read More →
avatar for Kristin Norris

Kristin Norris

Director of Assessment, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI)
Tracking, monitoring, evaluating, and assessing community engaged activities (e.g., community engaged research, teaching & learning, talent development, pipeline programs, outreach programs, events, technical training and assistance, student engagement) in order to tell a more ro... Read More →


Tuesday October 10, 2017 10:15am - 11:00am
Colorado H

10:15am

The Road to Economic Opportunities: Capitalizing Public Transit to Achieve an Anchor Mission (45 mins)
How often does public transit intersect with an anchor institution’s work? Look no further than outside your hotel window at Denver FasTrack light trail system. With the opening of the newest R line, the light rail system expanded from serving downtown Denver to a system that provides service to the thriving suburban community of Aurora, home to the University of Colorado - Anschutz Medical Campus, a major regional employer. Across the country, such transportation projects are serving as an economic catalyst connecting residents to employment, educational, and business opportunities with anchor institutions. Join Mile High Connects and Minneapolis-Saint Paul’s Central Corridor Anchor Partnership as we explore the potential to strengthen communities along transit by connecting them to opportunities within anchor institutions. Learn how Denver and Minneapolis-Saint Paul engaged anchor institutions and surrounding communities in exploring how transit could advance workforce diversity, supplier diversity, sustainability and other shared goals.

Speakers
avatar for Ellen Watters

Ellen Watters

Principal, Ellen Watters Consulting
Ellen Watters is a consultant in economic, workforce and community development focusing on research, project management and strategic planning to create prosperity in neighborhoods, cities and regions. She has particular expertise in developing strategies to leverage Anchor Inst... Read More →
avatar for Deyanira Zavala

Deyanira Zavala

Program Coordinator, Mile High Connects


Tuesday October 10, 2017 10:15am - 11:00am
Colorado C

10:15am

Commitment, Action, and Impact: Supporting People of Color in our Community Engagement Field (60 mins)
Join us in dialogue and fellowship as we come together to share our commitments, actions, and the impact of our efforts to support people of color in our community engagement work. This will be a highly interactive session designed to create a safe and brave space for people of color and others to share our strengths and struggles, as well as our ideas and inspirations for supporting and engaging with our students, faculty, and communities. We endeavor to create a space for reflection, rest, and renewal so we can continue our work with even greater focus, clarity, and energy!

Speakers
avatar for Elaine Ikeda

Elaine Ikeda

Executive Director, California Campus Compact
Since 2000, Elaine Ikeda has served as the Executive Director of California Campus | Compact (CACC). She has over 20 years of experience supervising volunteers in higher education, conducting research on service-learning, volunteerism and community service, and disseminating serv... Read More →
MM

Marisol Morales

Director of Civic and Community Engagement, University of La Verne
Marisol Morales is the founding Director of Civic and Community Engagement at the University of La Verne, a four-year comprehensive Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI) located in Southern California. In this role she founded the Office of Civic and Community Engagement in 2013 and... Read More →
avatar for Christopher Nayve

Christopher Nayve

Associate Vice President Community Engagement, University of San Diego



Tuesday October 10, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Denver 5

10:15am

President's Roundtable (invite only)
During this Presidents and Chancellors only working session participants will hear from experts and institutional leaders that have developed best practices, engage in robust discussion among peers, and develop strategies for returning home in several areas.

Tuesday October 10, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Denver 6

10:15am

Community Engagement and Graduate Training: Partnering for the Public Good
The University of Denver’s graduate and professional schools have profound influence on the metro Denver area and beyond. The University has a decades-long legacy of offering clinics to members of the community, partnering with local organizations for internships and community-based coursework, and engaging students in the community in ways that enhance their classroom learning.

As Denver experiences explosive growth in combination with the increasing need for mental and behavioral health expertise, the University’s Schools of Education, Social Work and Professional Psychology decided to collaborate in new and interdisciplinary ways. The deans of each school will discuss the opportunities and challenges that such substantial community engagement presents—from structural and capacity issues to data tracking and outcome measurement to quality control.

Speakers
avatar for Amanda McBride

Amanda McBride

Dean, Graduate School of Social Work, University of Denver
Professor Amanda Moore McBride is the Morris Endowed Dean of the Graduate School of Social Work. She is an internationally recognized expert in civic and community engagement, and her scholarship focuses on promoting engagement through education, programs and policy, addressing issues of inclusion. McBride's prior research has focused on national service, service learning and international volunteering. She has authored or co-authored more than 70 books, special journal issues and articles. | A leader in the field of community engagement in higher education, McBride has convened conferences and written on the topic for The Chronicle of Higher Education and The Huffington Post. She has consulted with the United States Corporation for National and Community Service, the United Nations Volunteer Program and the Social Science Research Council. She has organized more than 15 conferences and symposia, including a recent think tank on the rise of social innovation in higher education and how to best apply the academy's human capital in addressing entrenched social issues. A recent piece on the connections between social innovation and civic engagement was the lead article in... Read More →
avatar for Karen Riley

Karen Riley

Dean, Morgridge College of Education, University of Denver
Dr. Riley is the Dean for the Morgridge College of Educational at the University of Denver. Her education includes a B.S. in Psychology; a M.A. in Early Childhood Special Education, and a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology with an emphasis in Child and Family Studies. She completed... Read More →
SS

Shelly Smith-Acuna

Dean, Graduate School of Professional Psychology, University of Denver


Tuesday October 10, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Colorado G

10:15am

Philadelphia’s Collaborative Place-Making Transforms Students into Residents (60 mins)
Integrating college students into the life of a city requires multiple partners collaborating: higher eds, employers, arts and culture institutions and civic groups. Each of these partners realizes different benefits from students’ participation: higher eds can leverage the city as campus and for educational outcomes; employers gain interns and build a talent pipeline; arts and culture institutions develop their future audience members; and cities themselves have the chance to gain new residents. Campus Philly as acts as the connective tissue in Philadelphia to serve these various stakeholders and creates the place-making that transforms students into residents.
This panel includes Campus Philly’s core stakeholders; the Commerce Director of the City of Philadelphia and leaders from regional universities and large employers to discuss the value of having an organization that serves as the vehicle to welcome, integrate and retain regional college students. Each stakeholder will reflect on the reasons and ROI for this type of partnership and Campus Philly will share what it has learned about effective off-campus engagement in a dynamic, complex and vibrant metro region with a diverse student population.

Speakers
avatar for Deborah Diamond

Deborah Diamond

President, Campus Philly
I've led Campus Philly since 2010. We work with 35 college and university partners; 35 corporate members; and more than 50 cultural venues. Our mission is to help students fall in love with Philadelphia so that they stay after they graduate and 64% of them do! Our primary program... Read More →
HE

Harold Epps

City of Philadelphia
JF

Joanne Ferroni

Director of University and Community Partnerships, Drexel University
BP

Bret Perkins

Vice President, External and Government Affairs, Comcast Corporation
avatar for Nyeema Watson

Nyeema Watson

Associate Chancellor for Civic Engagement, Rutgers University--Camden


Tuesday October 10, 2017 10:15am - 11:15am
Colorado A

10:15am

Data-driven Storytelling: What’s Wrong With Traditional Reporting? (90 mins)
The idiom “like nailing jelly to the wall” refers to the impossible task of capturing something that, by its very nature, resists constraint. In a 2013 Currents article entitled It’s Like Trying to Nail JELL-O, the authors argue that traditional measures of ROI in higher education fundraising are incapable of predicting and assessing performance. They advise using a variety of metrics to get a holistic picture. Likewise, many engaged institutions find it difficult to capture the full scope and spectrum of their anchor mission’s impact. The University of Nebraska – Omaha is one of those institutions. Traditional measures of engagement (# of service-volunteer hours, value of service-volunteer hours, # of service learning courses, # of partnerships) are not representative of the many ways the University contributes to and benefits from the community.
At the 2016 CUMU conference, our team (listed above) presented research pertaining to UNO’s campus-wide effort to measure and assess community engagement. The lively and engaging panel discussion drew interest from audience members dealing with a similar issue on their respective campuses. This community conversation will extend and expand that dialogue. It asks whether there is a better way to tell the story of campus community impact in lieu of or in addition to the traditional metrics. Attendees will consider the current state of community engagement measurement, assessment and evaluation; the strengths and weaknesses of traditional measures; how it intersects with campus culture; its implications for institutionalizing engagement; and the challenge(s) it presents for their campus.

Speakers
KD

Keristiena Dodge

Project Specialist, University of Nebraska Omaha
AS

Anthony Starke Jr

Doctoral Candidate, University of Nebraska Omaha
DS

Deborah Smith-Howell

Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, University of Nebraska at Omaha


Tuesday October 10, 2017 10:15am - 11:45am
Colorado B

10:15am

Connecting Two Public Purpose of Higher Education: Community Engagement and Anchor Institution Strategy (90 mins)
Institutions of higher education are called to fulfill two public purposes: engaging in and with the local community and aligning resources to serve as anchor institutions. However, these public purposes are not traditionally connected in research or practice. This panel will explore the progress institutions of higher education have made to connect the concepts of community engagement and anchor institution strategy. Panelists will share anecdotes that include their personal background in community engagement and higher education. Panelists will also provide a clear summary of their institutions’ current practice in connecting these two concepts.

This session will also examine how the adoption of an anchor mission has helped spread the concept of community engagement to more areas of the institution (i.e. student body, human resources, and purchasing). Results indicating that faculty and staff who at first didn’t see a connection with community now have opportunities to develop more integrated and sustained approach approach. Specific focus will be dedicated to exploring ways to connect students to the anchor work of the institution through both curricular and co-curricular pathways, while also maintaining a commitment to long-standing relationships with community organizations that are founded in reciprocity. Session participants will have multiple opportunities to ask questions, provide feedback, and connect with colleagues during the session. This session is presented in collaboration with the Democracy Collaborative.

Speakers
avatar for Valerie Holton

Valerie Holton

Executive Editor, Senior Fellow, CUMU
Valerie Holton, PhD, LCSW is the executive editor of CUMU’s Metropolitan Universities (MUJ), a quarterly online journal for scholarship on cutting-edge issues impacting urban and metropolitan universities and colleges. Additionally, in her role as CUMU’s Senior Fellow, Valeri... Read More →
avatar for Ted Howard

Ted Howard

President and Co-Founder, The Democracy Collaborative
JJ

Jennifer Johnson Kebea

Executive Director, Lindy Center for Civic Engagement, Drexel University
JS

John Siskar

Ar Advisor for Educational Pipeline Initiatives, SUNY Buffalo State


Tuesday October 10, 2017 10:15am - 11:45am
Denver 4

10:45am

Classes, Cohorts, Community, and the City: the Urban Advantage (30 mins)
In the University of Nebraska Omaha’s University Honors Program, we designed and implemented two separate learning community cohorts in fall 2016. One cohort took three general education classes together, while the other cohort experienced a partnership of two classes. All the instructors coordinated student learning outcomes, subject matter (as possible), and assignments in order to build a shared learning opportunity for each cohort. The cohorts were extended (in partnered classes) in spring, and will continue throughout the students’ course of study; we are building our incoming cohorts for this fall currently.
While we thus designed and implemented on-campus community, we also encouraged urban engagement since students stepped outside of the classroom to explore the experience of other target populations in Omaha. Our urban advantage shone through in the ways in which we thus connnected the academic undertaking with the surrounding city through service learning activities, including interacting with elderly refugees so that they could develop their stories; students also worked with a local non-profit to map neighborhoods locally as part of an effort to prevent brain drain.
We will share our funding efforts, plans and their implementation. The lessons we have learned about the challenges and successes of such undertakings might help other Universities to undertake similar efforts. Indeed, we hope our example will grow across our own institution. Joined in academic experiences, cultural and social events, and enhanced by service learning engagement, we have added value and character to our students’ first-year experience—and beyond.

Speakers
LM

Lucy Morrison

Director of the University Honors Program, University of Nebraska at Omaha
MP

Matt Patton

Instructor, University Honors Program, University of Nebraska at Omaha


Tuesday October 10, 2017 10:45am - 11:15am
Colorado J

10:45am

Expanding the CURE: Broadening Participation in Course-based Undergraduate Research Experiences in STEM (30 mins)
Course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) provide an alternative to the apprenticeship model for high impact research immersion experiences. CUREs promote some of the same key learning outcomes as apprenticeships while increasing STEM retention and success. They are integrated into the curriculum and, therefore, deliver research immersion experiences in a structure that promotes inclusivity. The La Verne Keck Research Immersion Experience is a newly implemented program created to expand the benefits of the CURE model by developing technology intensive lower and upper division CUREs across a variety of STEM and associated disciplines (anthropology, kinesiology, and sociology). Successful achievement of program goals will yield implementation of eight CUREs taught by recruited faculty, pre-post gains in student learning outcomes, and gains in how well each CURE meets the key elements of the CURE model. Rolling implementation over a 3-year period was adopted, with the first four CUREs implemented in spring of 2017. Evaluations are being conducted using pre-post data on students' self-assessment of attitudes and scientific skills using the CURE survey, as well as at least one objective measure of skill in research design. Faculty teaching CUREs will be surveyed regarding the benefits, challenges, and faculty attributes associated with successful implementation. Common themes amongst faculty will be identified, analyzed, and compared to available data from programs at other institutions. Assessments will include students and faculty along with the impact on learning outcomes in order to provide guidance for future faculty to adopt the CURE model for their institution.

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Dunn

Sarah Dunn

Associate Professor of Kinesiology, University of La Verne
VP

Vanessa Preisler

Associate Professor and Chair of Physics, University of La Verne


Tuesday October 10, 2017 10:45am - 11:15am
Colorado D

11:00am

A Decade of Progress: Lessons Learned in Developing the UCO Downtown (45 mins)
For over a decade, the University of Central Oklahoma (UCO) has been engaged in defining its role within the Oklahoma City (OKC) Metropolitan Area. By 2013 an enhanced physical presence developed for UCO within OKC itself, including the creation of the Academy of Contemporary Music and the CHK|Central Boathouse. Afterwards, and in accordance with UCO’s strategic plan, Vision 2020, links between OKC and workforce development needs were explored in parallel with planning for an Innovation District by the Brookings Institution and the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce. Emerging from that planning is UCO Downtown, a flexible urban learning facility on the border of OKC’s Business District and the recently designated Innovation District. An upcoming renovation of offices and business incubators will provide additional space for the growth of UCO Downtown, as well as serving as home to Customized Education, a non-degree credit program serving metropolitan businesses. At least two cycles of enrollment have now occurred at UCO Downtown with increases of 169% in the spring semester (three cycles), 82% in the summer (two cycles), and 48% in the fall (two cycles). Indeed, programs are now beginning to anchor themselves into the OKC Downtown, including a Masters in Public Administration program and a Professional Science Masters program that will also serve adult learners. The convergence of UCO Downtown with recent recommendations by the Brookings Institution forms the basis for UCO’s goal of serving OKC’s workforce (especially in STEM) as well as the broader OKC community (Arts, Business, Education, Government, etc.).

Speakers
JB

John Barthell

Provost & VP of Academic Affairs, University of Central Oklahoma
CS

Charlotte Simmons

Associate VP of Academic Affairs, University of Central Oklahoma
avatar for Karen Youngblood

Karen Youngblood

Executive Director of Customized Education, University of Central Oklahoma
Certificates - Customized professional certificate programs and Continuing Education Unit (CEU) courses designed to equip you with the knowledge and skills for achieving your professional and personal goals. | | Courses - Customized learning opportunities for professional or... Read More →


Tuesday October 10, 2017 11:00am - 11:45am
Colorado I

11:00am

Elevating Latino Leaders: Why It Matters (45 mins)
The growing Latino population has dramatically changed the complexion of the United States and the State of Colorado. By 2050, population estimates predict that one in three Americans will be Latino. In Colorado, more than 21 percent of the population is Latino, with the average age of 26. Yet across all sectors, Latinos are underrepresented in leadership roles. The Latino Leadership Institute (LLI) at the University of Denver (DU) is the nation’s premier professional development program advancing an elite network of Latino leaders. Through its exceptional Fellowship Program, the Institute prepares Latino leaders for the highest levels of influence in the business, education, government, and non-profit sectors. A 501(c)3 organization founded in 2013, the LLI represents an integral part of DU’s Impact 2025 Strategic Plan to collaborate, empower, and lead. Our speaker will be Joelle Martinez, nationally respected non-profit executive, political strategist, and, since 2015, executive director of the Latino Leadership Institute at the University of Denver.

Speakers
avatar for Joelle Martinez

Joelle Martinez

Executive Director, Latino Leadership Institute, University of Denver


Tuesday October 10, 2017 11:00am - 11:45am
Colorado C

11:00am

The Hometown Colorado Initiative: An Adaptive Model for Campus-wide Community Engagement (45 mins)
The Hometown Colorado Initiative (HCI) at University of Colorado Denver partners with one local community during the academic year to provide campus-wide community engagement for both senior undergraduate and graduate-level students. Projects are generated by the community partner and are matched with CU Denver faculty and students in existing courses. HCI builds upon a fifty-year tradition to provide students with real world application of knowledge learned in the classroom. Each year, HCI engages faculty from multiple disciplines and hundreds of students. These students provide an estimated 20,000 to 30,000 hours of effort toward community projects, generating innovative designs, solutions and recommendations for the community.

CU Denver’s current community partner is the City of Arvada, with a two-year agreement to complete 20 projects that are part of the City’s livability goals. During the first year, completed projects focused on water conservation and attainable housing. Projects for the second year will include: developing transportation strategies for seniors, studies on land use costs and revenues, the role of the arts in creating economic development, a housing stock survey, transit station plans, neighborhood engagement strategies, and developing a community agricultural master plan.

HCI is one of CU Denver's premiere community engagement programs that will provide greater visibility of the university's role as an asset to communities as they strive to enhance quality of life. This workshop will dive deeper into the strategy and outcomes of HCI, and explore how its practices might be applied across the nation.

Speakers
MJ

Michael Jenson

Associate Dean , Academic Affairs, University of Colorado Denver


Tuesday October 10, 2017 11:00am - 11:45am
Colorado H

11:15am

CEC Catalyst Grants - Bringing a few people and resources together (30 mins)
Building new relationships, valuing each other’s expertise and addressing issues of mutual benefit, these are at the core of York University’s CEC Catalyst Grants Program supporting collaborations between Canada’s 3rd largest university and the surrounding Black Creek community in northwest Toronto (Canada). A program of the York U-TD Community Engagement Centre since 2015, the grants program is designed as an accessible, community-friendly small grants program that fosters innovative community and university collaborations and encourages new ways of working. Over the past three years, $75,000 has been awarded to over a dozen projects involving various University departments coming together with resident-led networks, grassroots coalitions and more established community organizations. Projects have addressed a variety of issues such as food security, STEM education, infant and maternal mental health, physical activity, educational attainment, environmental justice, urban planning, non-profit leadership, etc. While the Program offers modest seed funding and a simplified application process, project results are often more than originally anticipated and serve as ‘catalysts’ for longer term change. Projects have helped researchers secure larger research grants, equipped residents with data to influence policy or planning decisions, and leveraged new or deepened existing York and community relationships. Anticipating that bringing new and diverse partners together often require a shift in working styles, culture or power, projects that encounter challenges or struggle to reach their intended goals also provide valuable opportunities for critical reflection and learning. Finally, the program continues to serve as a best practice model for urban universities engaging with local communities.

Speakers
avatar for Yvette Munro

Yvette Munro

Director, Academic Partnerships and Planning, York University
LS

Lorna Schwartzentruber

Manager, York U-TD Community Engagement Centre


Tuesday October 10, 2017 11:15am - 11:45am
Colorado G

11:15am

Direct Care Worker Pathways Program: A Strategy For Seamless Academic Progression (30 mins)
Nationally, the demand for healthcare professionals is growing rapidly and this growth is projected to continue for the next decade. The goal of the “Direct Care Workforce Development Program” described in this presentation was to offer access points to health professional for many adult and nontraditional-aged students in direct care positions (e.g., patient care assistant) who aspire to advance to higher-level jobs paying family sustaining wages.
The direct care workforce that to advance encounters many challenges. Candidates often are not fluent in English, lack a foundation in basic numeracy skills, and have little or no experience with the application of technology as a tool for health care delivery. Therefore, this workforce presents both challenges and opportunities, requiring an array of support services to become ready for success in professional health-studies programs.
This presentation describes a partnership between an urban medical center, urban state university, and a labor union to provide seamless academic and career pathways for workers to enter the industry and progress in their careers through higher-levels of education. Two cohorts of workers from the medical center’s incumbent workforce enrolled in the program, which provided three courses totaling nine college credits. For most of the workers, this was their first college experience. Career maps and individual coaching helped the workers to define and visualize their goals. These maps contained actions steps toward achieving the goals. Several workers who completed the program matriculated into 2 and 4 year professional programs, while others made plans to do so in the future.

Speakers
MC

Marilyn Cleary

Assistant Dean, Worcester State University
LL

Linda Larrivee

Dean of Education, Health, and Natural Sciences, Worcester State University


Tuesday October 10, 2017 11:15am - 11:45am
Denver 5

11:15am

Gauging Experience: Implementation and Assessment of an Experiential Learning Initiative (30 mins)
In 2010, the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (UTC) implemented an institution-wide five year Quality Enhancement Plan, ThinkAchieve, focused on critical thinking and experiential learning (EL). There were three components to the initiative that involved 1) new student orientation, 2) enhanced critical thinking instruction, and 3) EL opportunities. Beyond the first five years, departmental and administrative support yielded the continuation of a growing EL platform based on a blend of faculty, staff, and undergraduate student initiative and recognition, including a student graduation award. The current pathways for student involvement at UTC include designated EL classes, non-academic credit bearing experiences, community engagement agreements, and campus and community events. Critical Reflection is a central theme of EL at UTC and is required for the each of the ways by which students can be involved. Some of this reflection is directed by faculty, while some is directed by students and reviewed by faculty, staff and community partners. Critical thinking student learning outcomes measured by assessments are also used in academic credit bearing experiences. Much of the growth of the platform may be attributable to its augmenting, rather than competing with, existing campus and community endeavors and programs. As interest in EL grows at UTC and in many areas of higher education, incorporation and differentiation of EL into existing institutional frameworks are indicators of how to engage the needs of a regional, comprehensive University.

Speakers
BC

Bengt Carlson

Experential Learning Coordinator, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
DF

Dawn Ford

Executive Director-Walker Ctr for Teaching, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga


Tuesday October 10, 2017 11:15am - 11:45am
Colorado A

11:15am

How a collaboration across campuses promises to make Indiana smarter and healthier (30 mins)
This presentation discusses a new Indiana University initiative that addresses the issue of population health and the need for creating a new generation of health care professionals. The “IU Regional Health Consortium” is a collaborative protocol offering two new health care programs, a medical humanities minor and an allied health practitioners credentialing program. The consortium aims to provide IU students with additional educational opportunities in STEM fields, contribute to a culture that focuses on health, enhance the current economic and developmental value to regional communities, and prepare a new generation of health practitioners to respond to a growing health care labor market. The consortium stems from an internal collaboration (within each campus) and an effective inter-campus recruitment and collaboration. In addition, the consortium expands the collaboration between each campus involved in the protocol and the community at large, targeting various local and state agencies to develop internships, practicum programs, and service learning opportunities for all students.

Speakers
CC

chaeyoung chang

assistant professor, Indiana University Northwest School of Public and Environmental Affairs
MS

Monica Solinas-Saunders

Associate Professor, Indiana University Northwest


Tuesday October 10, 2017 11:15am - 11:45am
Colorado D

11:15am

Treating the Carnegie application process as a planned change intervention through the development of a liaison program (30 mins)
The Carnegie Classification of Community Engagement has served to recognize institutions of higher education and their commitment to the development, support, and assessment to community engaged activities. Institutions of higher education seeking to acquire the classification are voluntarily initiating a planned change intervention directed at making community engagement part of their mission through alignment with the institution’s strategic plan. Under Porras and Silvers’ (1991) model of planned change, there are two types of planned change interventions: Organization Development and Organizational Transformation. Under this model, Organization Development deals with work settings, including organizing arrangements, social factors, technologies and physical settings. Organization Transformation deals with vision, which includes guiding beliefs and principles, purpose, and mission. In order for transformational change to be realized and maintained, individual organizational members must also experience cognitive change (Porras & Silvers, 1991). Therefore, it is important for faculty to be involved in any university intention to promote sustainable change. For this reason, Florida Atlantic University has developed the Community Engagement Liaison Program (CELP) at the college level. This program has taught us how purposive structuration of co-op committees can be helpful in initiating both organization development and transformation. The program was initially developed to assess the extent of community-engaged activity of the colleges, however it soon evolved into a holistic resource for organizational transformation as it involves faculty members at the core of our community engagement initiatives. At FAU, we seek to experience a transformational change (OT) as a result of participating in the Carnegie Classification process.

Speakers
AB

Aloha Balza

PhD Student, Florida Atlantic University
RN

Ronald Nyhan

Associate Dean, Florida Atlantic University


Tuesday October 10, 2017 11:15am - 11:45am
Colorado J

11:45am

Tuesday Luncheon Plenary—View from the Top
Enjoy lunch and a panel discussion on the role higher education plays in the success of businesses—from talent acquisition and workforce development to quality of life for employees and the important role of scholarship and research to a thriving business community. Welcome remarks and introductions provided by Dorothy Horrell, Chancellor, University of Colorado Denver.

Kelly Brough, President & CEO of the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce, will moderate the panel of leading CEOs, including:
  • Kirk Mielenz, president of Revgen Partners
  • Debbie Zuege, chief nursing officer, Kaiser Permanente
  • David Eves, president, Xcel Energy Colorado 

Speakers
avatar for Kelly Brough

Kelly Brough

President and CEO, Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce
As president and CEO of the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce, Kelly Brough is focused on putting more Coloradans to work – in really great jobs. It’s a clear call to action that’s driven this CEO from higher education to City Hall to the Chamber. Kelly has worked to advance our state and find opportunities for improvement, whether... Read More →
avatar for David Eves

David Eves

President, Xcel Energy
David Eves is president of Xcel Energy - Colorado. He also serves as a director of Public Service Company of Colorado. | | Previously he served as president and CEO of Southwestern Public Service Company. He also has served as vice president of Resource Planning and Acquisitio... Read More →
avatar for Dorothy Horrell

Dorothy Horrell

Chancellor, University of Colorado Denver
About Chancellor Dorothy Horrell | Dorothy A. Horrell, PhD has been chancellor of the University of Colorado Denver since January 2016. She is leading the university toward becoming a top asset of the city of Denver by prioritizing​ student success, scholarly excellence, community impact, inclusive excellence and financial... Read More →
avatar for Kirk Mielenz

Kirk Mielenz

President, RevGen Partners
Prior to co-founding RevGen Partners, Kirk held positions at Hitachi Consulting and Arthur Andersen where he led teams on numerous high-profile client engagements. Kirk is currently serving on the board of directors at the Denver Public Schools Foundation. He is the proud father... Read More →
avatar for Debbie Zuege

Debbie Zuege

Chief Nursing Executive, Kaiser Permanente Colorado
Debbie Zuege, RN is Chief Nursing Executive for Kaiser Permanente in Colorado—the first position of its kind for the state’s largest nonprofit health plan. In this role, Zuege is responsible for the nursing care delivery of more than 2,000 registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, medical assistants, advanced practice nurses and physician assistants who provide care to the more than 670,000 Kaiser Permanente Colorado members. She is also responsible for the transformation of care delivery, performance improvement, infection prevention and control, emergency management, improving patient and workplace safety and ongoing nursing professional... Read More →


Tuesday October 10, 2017 11:45am - 1:30pm
Colorado Ballrooms

1:45pm

A Model for Community Engaged Scholarship: Practicing What We Preach (45 mins)
The Division of Community Engagement at California State University San Marcos values and takes seriously community engaged work, from Community Service Learning to Community Engaged Scholarship. Our division has put a great deal of time, energy, and resources toward supporting faculty who do this type of work. But what about faculty who want to do community engaged work, but are not sure how to start? How can we support them in their transition into community engaged work? In Fall 2017 the Division unveiled a “Model Community Engaged Scholarship” program—which is overseen by the Faculty Director of Community Engaged Scholarship—in which faculty receive a stipend to work with a community partner on a project. The community partner was selected by the Division; each year a new partner is selected. Faculty work with the partner to meet the partner’s needs, and get on-the-ground experience in best practices for community engaged work.  In this lightening session the Faculty Director of Community Engaged Scholarship will briefly discuss the goals and progress of the program.

Speakers
JL

Jodie Lawston

California State University, San Marcos


Tuesday October 10, 2017 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Colorado G

1:45pm

Canoeing Into the Community: A Summer Field Experience for Students and Citizen Scientists (45 mins)
The Wisconsin Rivers Project (WRP) is a faculty led summer field experience for students interested in engaging in environmental science fieldwork while making media about Wisconsin’s freshwater resources. The WRP is a new (2017) summer experience at Marquette University. The WRP produces and maintains an interactive web platform that combines science reporting, geo-located storytelling, short form documentary film, photography, and data visualization. The WRP impacts the community by: 1.) raising awareness about environmental issues affecting WI rivers, 2.) supporting the work of local non-profit groups such as MKE Riverkeeper, and 3.) visualizing data related to environmental monitoring projects in WI rivers. Students engaged in the WRP interact with the community by assisting in the collection of water quality data, learning about the issues affecting residents living close to Wisconsin’s urban and rural rivers, and by producing media about their findings. A significant aspect of the WRP involves hiking, canoeing, and camping along WI rivers while exploring the literature of WI conservationists such as Aldo Leopold. This CUMU Lighting Session presentation introduces the scope of the Wisconsin Rivers Project, showcases some of the resulting media from the 2017 class, and offers resources to other universities interested in creating similar programs.

Speakers
JB

Joe Brown

Assistant Professor, Digital Media, Marquette University


Tuesday October 10, 2017 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Colorado B

1:45pm

Community Engagement through Drumming (45 mins)
I was hired at Oakland University (OU) twenty years ago to teach an African drum course that started many years before my arrival in 1975. For more than forty years, OU has offered African drumming classes to a wide range of students. During this time, there have been yearly morning concerts presented for students from neighboring schools to enjoy. Our 425-seat concert hall had been regularly filled to capacity for these events, until Michigan went into a deep recession and public school funding for transportation was eliminated.

With attendance dwindling, I decided to try something new. This past fall, through the support of the OU/Pontiac Initiative, I took our annual program into the community. The OU African Ensemble, together with master Ghanaian drummer Paschal Younge, presented a weekend community workshop and concert at the Pontiac Creative Art Center (PCAC). This event was the culmination of Paschal’s weeklong residency at OU, and was a great opportunity to share the fruits of our collaboration with the wider community, who delighted in singing, clapping, drumming, and dancing.

In my short talk, I will reflect on the powerful sense of community at this event and the absolute joy that filled the PCAC. I will also present short reflections from my students, for whom sharing what they had learned with our wider community was a life-affirming experience. Finally, I will discuss our plans to repeat this successful event in the fall of 2017.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Stone

Mark Stone

Assoc. Prof. of Music, Oakland University
Mark Stone is Associate Professor of Music at Oakland University, where he coordinates the world music and percussion programs. He is also the Arts Area Leader for the OU/Pontiac Initiative and a member of the Pontiac Arts Commission. Through the OU/Pontiac Initiative, Mark recen... Read More →


Tuesday October 10, 2017 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Colorado B

1:45pm

Engaged members of our society: Coppin State University's Doctoral Program focus on empowering and informing the community (45 mins)
For a community to improve its health, residents must understand and pursue changes in order to eliminate or reduce factors that contribute to health problems. Health promotion and education can assist residents to become empowered to make informed decision about their health and social well-being. A leading initiative of the university is community engagement. The Helene Fuld School of Nursing Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program integrates principles and activities for community engagement in the curriculum. The program emphasizes and promotes practice initiatives to promote an optimal level of health and wellbeing. Didactic and practicum experiences include an integration of the social determinates of health as critical to enhancing and improving the well-being of community residents. Practicum hours are spent at agencies that provide primary health care, behavioral health, and social well-being. Students participate as members of a state senator Task Force on the Social Determinants of health. The students actively seek to engage the community through initiatives such as a DNP Symposium most recently aimed at linking patients to resources with the utilization of health information technology. Integrated throughout their studies is the development and implementation of a project that addresses a need in the community, provide the opportunity to, for example, link policy making with clinical systems, translate research into practice and/or serve as change agents for health care. The academic plan culminates in a final project that addresses a community need based in part on an assessment of community needs and health status information about the community.

Speakers
JP

Jennifer Pope

Assistant Professor, Coppin State University
JT

Joan Tilghman

Chairperson DNP Program, Coppin State University


Tuesday October 10, 2017 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Colorado H

1:45pm

Engagement through political strife: how to re-engage the community
If you deal with an immigrant population you may have noticed a slight drawback in participation this year following the election of our now president. I work primarily in a large Hispanic community. Parent University is the program I run which offers free classes to parents under these four categories: health and wellness, effective parenting, navigating the education system, and personal growth and development. This is a relatively new program that experienced a quick reduction in parent participation. In my community Hispanic families have lined up for hours just to see a notary that could write a note for their child not to be given away to social services in the case they are deported. So what do we do now? My topic is to foster the discussion of ways to re-engage community participation that involves trust and meaningful experiences that they may find helpful and beneficial.

Speakers
avatar for Gabriela Sullen

Gabriela Sullen

Grad Student, Oakland University
Gabriela Sullen is a Detroit native, working as an intern under the guidance of Detroit Health Department Deputy Director Leseliey Welch. During the school year, Ms. Sullen serves as Program Coordinator for the Pontiac School District’s Parent University, where she has created... Read More →


Tuesday October 10, 2017 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Colorado B

1:45pm

Faculty & Staff Book Groups: Common Ground for Conversation & Cultural Competence (45 mins)
The case-example presentation will first review a definition of cultural competence that ranges from reflection to action. Applying the definition, this best practice session centers on the use of faculty and staff book discussion groups to advance an institution’s diversity mission. Central aspects of the book groups including organization, goals, process, and outcomes are included in this presentation. An outcome of the book discussion groups was the strengthened cultural competence of participants, with many developing constructive strategies for confronting racism (and other “isms”), however subtle, within themselves or in the systems around them. The use of faculty and staff book groups as a purposeful step in advancing the inclusion mission of the institution will be framed within the context of a multi-year university dialogue of what it means to be a Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI). This ongoing institutional conversation, including methods like book groups to structure and scaffold the organizational learning, provides a model for intentional, organization-wide change. The high impact of book discussion groups, in this case in support of social justice, draws strength in aligning personal, professional, and institutional aims.

Speakers
BG

Beatriz Gonzalez

Vice Provost & Chief Diversity Officer, University of La Verne
avatar for Zandra Wagoner

Zandra Wagoner

University Chaplain, University of La Verne


Tuesday October 10, 2017 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Colorado B

1:45pm

Food insecurity and campus climate: University development of needed resources (45 mins)
Campus climate research examines the experiences of our students within the university community: How do they “feel” on campus? This includes feelings of safety, and respectful engagement, along with belonging and opportunity. Extant literature on campus climate suggests that minority students have less favorable perceptions of campus climate as compared to their majority counterparts. Campus climate is an integral topic for many reasons, in particular because positive perceptions of campus climate may be associated with higher academic engagement, GPA, and retention and graduation rates.

This project examined food insecurity through a campus climate lens. Food insecurity on college campuses is a substantial problem that has received increased attention over the past few years. The existing literature suggests that food insecurity among college students is more prevalent than among the general U.S. population (14.5%). There is a dearth of literature to date that has focused on the relationship between food insecurity and campus climate, and this connection is especially important given the necessary social justice focus on inclusiveness within higher education. [food pantry] was established in 2014 in order to address food insecurity, and thus access to higher education among a diverse student community.  

This presentation will focus on the development and implementation of our campus climate study. In addition, this presentation will present an overview of food insecurity, as related to diversity and inclusiveness within our campus communities. Finally, we will describe our integration of community exploration, research, and social action projects.

Speakers
CM

Caroline Macke

Northern Kentucky University
JT

Jessica Taylor

Assistant Professor, Northern Kentucky University


Tuesday October 10, 2017 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Colorado A

1:45pm

Growing the Capacity to Address Hunger and Create Social Change (45 mins)
Food insecurity is a lack of access to enough food for an active, healthy life (U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2014). This session will provide participants with the opportunity to learn how UNC Charlotte faculty, professional staff, students, alumni, community partners, and local corporate sponsors are working to address issues of hunger, nutrition, and food insecurity on our campus and in our community. Presenters will share information about the Jamil Niner Student Pantry and community garden at UNC Charlotte, and they ways in which undergraduate research, learning communities, student internships, and student organizations have bridged faculty, staff, and community participation in the establishment and maintenance of the pantry as a resource. This session will highlight student and community learning through capacity building and will address issues, challenges, and solutions to student food insecurity at UNC Charlotte.

Speakers
JH

Jordan Harris

Associate Director, Community Relations, UNC Charlotte
Employee engagement, employee volunteerism, social equity
JM

Jenny Matz

Director of Communications Operations, UNC Charlotte


Tuesday October 10, 2017 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Colorado A

1:45pm

Is Community Engagement REALLY A Strategy Through Which We Achieve Our Mission & Goals? (45 mins)
As campuses adopt a broader interpretation of community engagement, so has the need to reflect upon what is required to institutionalize community engagement and how this is connected to the institutional mission and goals. Historically, the field has emphasized the importance of infrastructure and much of our success can be attributed to infrastructure (Welch & Saltmarsh, 2013). This article differentiates between infrastructure and organizational structure, and calls attention to a greater vision in which community engagement is understood as a strategy that transforms higher education, changes power relations in society, and democratizes our political system (Stanton, Giles, & Cruz, 1999).

Speakers
avatar for Kristin Norris

Kristin Norris

Director of Assessment, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI)
Tracking, monitoring, evaluating, and assessing community engaged activities (e.g., community engaged research, teaching & learning, talent development, pipeline programs, outreach programs, events, technical training and assistance, student engagement) in order to tell a more ro... Read More →


Tuesday October 10, 2017 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Colorado G

1:45pm

Making teaching more inclusive and democratic: Can we educate for citizenship through classroom practices and pedagogy? (45 mins)
This lightning session will provide some food for thought about educating our students for citizenship through a democratic and inclusive classroom. What happens when students practice the skills of democracy (discussion, debate, dialogue, community organizing and norming) within a classroom? What happens when educators build inclusive environments that truly value all perspectives, experiences, and ideas? If we want our students to work to answer the most pressing community problems in our metropolitan communities, how can they do so without first practicing the skills required of democracy? While a popular notion, it is not always put into practice. This session will offer insights about how can faculty build syllabi, course norms, assignments and assessment strategies with democracy and inclusion in mind. From her rich experiences with service-learning and civic/democratic engagement and student-faculty partnerships, Dr. Sponsler will offer ideas and specific examples from her own teaching practice to inspire colleagues to think about their own teaching and service.

Speakers
avatar for Laura Sponsler

Laura Sponsler

Clinical Assistant Professor, University of Denver
Ask me about civic learning and democratic engagement in the curriculum and co-curriculum and the public purposes of higher education.


Tuesday October 10, 2017 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Colorado H

1:45pm

My experience with shared spaces and how campus shared spaces may transform a learning community (45 mins)
Shared workspaces have become more popular in corporate America, as the globalization of the economy necessitates more teamwork and collaboration between a growing number of knowledge workers. Shared spaces are said to facilitate individuals’ capability of communication, collaboration, brainstorming, and an overall culture of transparency within an organization. These values of communication and collaboration are essential to achieving the missions of Universities as well. The Wietz Community Engagement Center at the University of Nebraska at Omaha is a shared space designed to house both community partners and University organizations with the intention of facilitating more interaction between the University and the surrounding community. Both University and Community partners operate in an open floor plan. In my experience at the Community Engagement Center, I have been both a tenant of and evaluator of the space. I have found that the benefits of the space are numerous, including increased ability to network, the exchange of knowledge and skills, and a sense of belonging and community among tenants. Many of these benefits would also benefit academic researchers, and shared spaces may be one way to combat the siloing behavior between academic departments. Interdisciplinary collaboration would greatly benefit Universities by helping to disseminate important research and best practices among departments and encouraging more innovation as knowledge is integrated from different departments. Are Universities open to changing the way they operate and re-organizing their physical spaces in order to reap these benefits? What challenges will they face if they prepare to do so?

Speakers
avatar for Kelly Prange

Kelly Prange

Doctoral Candidate, University of Nebraska at Omaha


Tuesday October 10, 2017 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Colorado G

1:45pm

Placing Local Food Access Issues into a Global Context (45 mins)
I led service- learning/ civic engagement programs at several universities before assuming a faculty position within the Department of History & Philosophy at Virginia State University. Among the courses that I teach is World Regional Geography. My approach to teaching it is thematic and Food is one of the nine themes of the course.

Virginia State University is in Petersburg. A small city situated south of Richmond that was historically home to a large free Black community prior to the Civil War. Deindustrialization in the 1970s and 1980s left the small city facing severe economic issues, rising crime, and health disparities. Lacking access to fresh, affordable foods, Petersburg has reached USDA food desert status.

In this Lightning Session presentation, I will present 1) very brief description of the community gardening initiative history 2) the broader response and support from across the university to the initiative and 3) how it transforms my own individual coursework in Geography allowing students to place local food access issues into a global context and to encourage attendees to pursue such partnerships.

Speakers
AT

Anne-Marie Turnage

Instructor, Virginia State University


Tuesday October 10, 2017 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Colorado A

1:45pm

Successful Partnerships for Student Success: How to Make an Academic Affairs/Student Affairs partnership work (45 mins)
Washington State University Vancouver, a campus of the WSU system, is a nonresidential campus with 3500 students, primarily undergraduates, with the majority entering as transfers. Academic Affairs and Students Affairs have created formal partnerships through a Student Success Council and Enrollment Management Council for the primary purpose of expanding educational opportunities for students in the region through aggressive enrollment growth, and increasing student persistence and success. These formal partnerships have produced tangible positive results. We will discuss these results and the creation of data-informed initiatives. We will also address in detail the mechanisms we have used to make this partnership across divisional boundaries work effectively.

Tuesday October 10, 2017 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Colorado H

1:45pm

The CSUN Innovates! Interest Group: Fueling an Innovation Ecosystem Every Monday Morning (45 mins)
Let’s explore the evolution and influence of a grassroots innovation interest group at California State University, Northridge and how its weekly meetings:

• Reinvent the traditional university framework of collegiality and collaboration to inspire innovation and creativity
• Break down silos by convening individuals across functions and organizational levels
• Create a safe, positive, collaborative space for conversations about what is and what might be
• Welcome diverse participants who are unified by a shared enthusiasm for finding new ways to achieve campus priorities
• Maximize engagement with a reliable communications strategy and regular meetings that keep the innovation conversation steadily moving forward
• Articulate and foster an open attendance policy, enabling occasional participation to be easy and guilt-free
• Define “innovation” and “creativity” broadly, allowing for unexpected connections which spark project or program trajectories that transcend preconceived ideas of what innovation looks like
• Provide a big-picture view of the university enterprise and its many moving pieces, giving individuals a better sense of how their work aligns with and can support the whole
• Carry the full support of the University President, which affirms and energizes attendee participation

Speakers
avatar for Julia Potter

Julia Potter

Director, Strategic Partnerships & Special Initiatives, California State University, Northridge
I'm looking forward to talking about infusing innovation in university campus communities. | | It is my honor to serve as the Director for Strategic Partnerships and Special Initiatives in the Office of the President at California State University, Northridge (CSUN). My res... Read More →


Tuesday October 10, 2017 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Colorado A

1:45pm

You're an anchor institution. Now what? (45 mins)
Colleges and universities are anchor institutions in our communities. We tend to be place-based, our identities shaped indelibly by our place and our community’s people, with our missions more often than not explicitly invoking commitments to the public good. How do we take this identity and these commitments more seriously? Why should we? Why must we? This lightning session will present one institution’s approach, but also open vistas onto the growing movement among colleges and universities to embrace our “anchorness.”

Speakers
avatar for Peter Englot

Peter Englot

Senior Vice Chancellor for Public Affairs, Rutgers University - Newark
As Senior Vice Chancellor for Public Affairs and Chief of Staff at Rutgers University – Newark (RU-N), Peter Englot leads the university’s communications efforts and supports Chancellor Nancy Cantor and her leadership team in coordination of activities across their divisions... Read More →


Tuesday October 10, 2017 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Colorado G

1:45pm

Amplifying the Urban and Metropolitan Voice in Washington and Beyond: How to Play Your Trump Card (45 mins)
Whether you are a university administrator, professor, or President with little experience or an in-depth history of dealing with Washington insiders, you may be questioning how, in today’s political environment, you can create a positive impact for you, your institution, and your students. Some may view Washington’s current political state as uncharted territory, but the policymaking and policy-influencing process is still navigable and full of opportunities for urban and metropolitan universities.

This two-part, interactive series teaches attendees how to amplify their voice on relevant issues to reach above the fray in Washington and achieve a win, whether it’s national recognition, funding, partnerships, a policy change, or other forms of success. Led by members of Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer’s DC education policy team, the first part of the series provides attendees with an overview of the current landscape in Washington and profile-raising strategies for how to navigate and engage in the process. Part 2 of the workshop uses real case studies (submitted in advance by CUMU members, if possible, or surveyed on site) to walk participants through the development and implementation of a profile-raising approach to achieving a win in Washington.

Attendees will leave the workshop with the top 10 takeaways on how to strategically develop their policy asks, identify their audience within and outside of the federal government, create effective messaging about issues affecting urban/metropolitan institutions, cultivate relationships, and employ other strategies that leverage individuals at their institutions as a “thought-leaders” and advance their priorities in our nation’s capital.

Speakers
avatar for Sara Linder

Sara Linder

Senior Policy Specialist, Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP
avatar for Amy Smith

Amy Smith

Policy Advisor, Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer
Extensive experience in Washington, DC providing policy guidance to and advocating on behalf of higher education entities.
DW

Dana Weekes

Associate, Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP


Tuesday October 10, 2017 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Colorado D

1:45pm

Anchored in Community: Building an Institutional Approach to Regional Prosperity (45 mins)
A university engagement agenda for regional prosperity requires that an institution pursue responsive, cross-sector collaboration with actors at many levels to achieve the complementarity and scale necessary to register progress toward shared community, economic and workforce development objectives. Yet to contribute in a way that is both generative and sustaining, a university’s ability to adapt its own organizational behavior and internal processes are equally important to its external endeavors. When the two processes impel one another, both organizational learning and sensemaking can result (Kezar, 2013).

Metropolitan State University has long pursued community partnerships to support experiential learning, teaching and scholarship, but in recent years it has sought to understand and more fully embrace the identity and responsibilities of an anchor institution. Guided by the essential characteristics of successful regional engagement named in AASCU’s Stepping Forward as Stewards of Place (2002), the university has employed strategies that are place-based, mutually beneficial, interactive and integrated. During this process, internal misalignments and other errors in the environment have been detected and addressed producing organizational learning, while engagement with externally-situated actors and expertise has facilitated new perspectives that challenge underlying assumptions and values to fuel organizational sense-making.

In this interactive workshop session, participants will consider the streams of engagement that are common to state comprehensive universities’ regional prosperity efforts and how their confluence can be harnessed to expand a civic ethos into spaces and processes not traditionally associated with a university’s community engagement activity.

Speakers
JB

Jodi Bantley

Community Engagement Coordinator, Metropolitan State University
avatar for Greg Mellas

Greg Mellas

Director of Inst for Comm Engagement & Scholarship, Metropolitan State University
Greg Mellas has 20 years of experience working in community engagement, outreach and development in domestic and international settings. As director of Metropolitan State University’s Institute for Community Engagement and Scholarship, Greg leads the university’s civic and co... Read More →


Tuesday October 10, 2017 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Colorado I

1:45pm

Authentic Engagement: How (or) can We Engage Multiple Stakeholders to Develop Solutions to Critical Challenges in a Short Time Frame? (45 mins)
The big challenges facing urban communities require mutually beneficial and reciprocal university and community engagement to build on assets and co-create solutions. Deep and meaningful (i.e. authentic) engagement takes time. But people, families and communities experiencing poverty, police brutality, deportation, hunger, homeless and more do not have the luxury of time. Authentic engagement develops through trust, transparency, vulnerability, and willingness to stick through difficulties and conflict. This workshop will explore methods and approaches that balance the need for authentic engagement with the urgency of social harms our urban communities are currently experiencing. The facilitators will present ideas and lessons learned from their work to create an action research engagement process (AREP) for the Young Women’s Initiative of Minnesota, a statewide effort to address gender disparities through an “intersectional” lens. The AREP centered on young women and their communities in eight groups (African-American, African Immigrant, American Indian, Asian Pacific Islander, Latinx/Hispanic, LGBTQ+, young women with disabilities, and young women living in rural Minnesota). We had 5 months and a staff of 14 people to engage over 500 stakeholders. We will share strengths and challenges to stimulate dialogue and discussion. The bulk of the session will be an interactive workshop for participants to work together to surface strategies and tools that foster authentic engagement under short timelines.

Speakers
avatar for Lauren Martin

Lauren Martin

Director of Research, Robert J. Jones Urban Research and Outreach-Engagement Center
Lauren Martin PhD is the Director of Research at the University of Minnesota’s Urban Research Outreach-Engagement Center (UROC), as well as affiliated faculty at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs. Lauren leads UROC’s sex trading, trafficking and community wellbeing initia... Read More →
avatar for Makeda Zulu-Gillespie

Makeda Zulu-Gillespie

Director of Outreach, Robert J. Jones Urban Research and Outreach-Engagement Center
Makeda Zulu-Gillespie works to establish Community-University relationships. She co-chairs the Community Affairs Committee, responds to community inquiries, represents UROC at community forums, and develops activities to strengthen long-term partnerships between the University an... Read More →


Tuesday October 10, 2017 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Colorado J

1:45pm

Leadership, Education and Collective Impact: Battling Substance Use and Abuse Among Youth and Young Adults (45 mins)
There is no vaccine to prevent young people from using alcohol, marijuana and other drugs, but there are evidence based prevention programs that can reduce the risk of substance use disorders. Moving away from ineffective “scared straight” models and focusing on prevention efforts based on theories of growth, development and human behavior that extend beyond the classroom and home have demonstrated encouraging findings. Further, university-community partnerships are noted as impactful approaches to addressing “wicked problems” in communities with deeply entrenched social norms and high availability of substances. Using a collective impact approach, Tackling Youth Substance Abuse (TYSA), a cross-sector community coalition on Staten Island (SI), formed in 2011 to address high prevalence of underage drinking and prescription drug misuse among young people. Guided by principles of collective impact, TYSA aligns the work of diverse partners and seeks to maximize impact by coordinating efforts across SI. Wagner College, a local SI University, has been instrumental in the coalition’s activities since its inception. This partnership facilitated a relationship between Wagner faculty, students and community-based programs through experiential learning and community engagement opportunities. Through membership, Wagner has gained access to prevention, treatment and recovery providers, elected officials, school personnel, parents, youth, pharmacists and a host of additional stakeholders all working towards reducing the burden of youth and young adult substance use in the community. Through comprehensive environmental approaches across the continuum of services, this multi-sectoral collaborative has begun to observe reductions in alcohol consumption and prescription drug misuse prevalence among SI youth.

Speakers
AA

Adrienne Abbate

Staten Island Partnership for Community Wellness
JR

Jazmin Rivera

TYSA Program Manager, Staten Island partnership for Community Wellness
PT

Patricia Tooker

Dean, Wagner College


Tuesday October 10, 2017 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Colorado C

1:45pm

Engaging Engagement: Kyoto and Portland partner to elevate high impact practices
Portland State University has a long established community engagement tradition that has brought alive what it means to be an urban serving institution. Engagement is evidenced in the institution’s teaching and research and has been a key high impact practice that serves as a hallmark of the PSU experience. Ryukoku University in Kyoto, Japan has a community engagement agenda that is inspired by the Kyoto Alliance. Using a learning community model Portland State and Ryukoku University faculty and staff are sharing their community engagement practices and teaching each other some powerful lessons about how to best advance our work. We will provide some best practices across cultures and will provide some data that illustrates the power of community engagement as a high impact practice.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Alkezweeny

Jennifer Alkezweeny

Teaching, Learning, and Engagement Associate, Portland State University
KM

Kazuyo Murata

Professor, Ryukoku University
KS

Katsutaka Shiraishi

Professor, Ryukoku University
avatar for Amy Spring

Amy Spring

Community Research and Partnerships Director, Portland State University, Research & Strategic Partnerships (RSP)


Tuesday October 10, 2017 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Denver 5

2:30pm

Coffee Break
Tuesday October 10, 2017 2:30pm - 3:00pm
Colorado Ballrooms

3:00pm

Advancing Public Good Collaboration: Values, Frameworks, and Strategies (30 mins)
This workshop will draw on initiatives of the University of Denver’s Center for Community Engagement & Service Learning’s (CCESL) to identify values, frameworks, and strategies that advance collaboration for the public good. CCESL initiatives support faculty community-engaged scholarship, provide leadership opportunities to students, and work to address community-identified needs. CCESL’s work is grounded in principles of community-engaged scholarship and teaching, as well as in the community-organizing model. Students and faculty work emphasizes inclusiveness, participation, task sharing, reciprocity in public problem solving, and an equality of respect for the knowledge and experience that everyone involved contributes to education and community building. We will provide examples of successful programs that targeted individual faculty, students, and organizations, and the evolution of new efforts to advance multidisciplinary community-engaged collaborations.

The workshop will be presented by Drs. Anne P. DePrince and Cara DiEnno. DePrince is Professor and Chair of Psychology as well as Director of the Center for Community Engagement and Service Learning (CCESL). She received the 2015 Thomas Ehrlich Civically Engaged Faculty Award from Campus Compact. DiEnno is Associate Director of CCESL.

Speakers
AD

Anne DePrince

Professor, Psychology, University of Denver
avatar for Cara DiEnno

Cara DiEnno

Associate Director, University of Denver
Cara serves as the Associate Director in the University of Denver’s Center for Community Engagement and Service Learning, where she supports faculty, staff and students in their community-engaged work – collaborating with the community to advance social justice and live out t... Read More →


Tuesday October 10, 2017 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Denver 5

3:00pm

Building shared understanding in a public-private partnership: lessons from Milwaukee’s Near West Side Partners (30 mins)
In 2014, five key anchor institutions and corporations – including Aurora Health Care/Sinai Hospital, Harley-Davidson, Marquette University, MillerCoors and Potawatomi Business Development Corporation – came together to form a non-profit, public-private partnership, the Near West Side Partners, Inc. (NWSP). Through collaborative efforts, the NWSP seeks to revitalize and sustain Milwaukee’s Near West Side as a thriving business and residential corridor, promoting economic development, improving housing, unifying neighborhood identity and branding, and providing greater safety for residents, students, visitors, and businesses.
The Promoting Assets Reducing Crime (PARC) initiative is a multi-year, community-based participatory research project of NWSP. PARC has two primary goals: (1) promoting assets to transform the negative perception of the neighborhood and (2) reducing crime to address the reality of the neighborhood's challenges. The PARC Team is a collaborative group comprised of academic researchers, students, residents, business improvement districts, anchor institutions, law enforcement, nonprofits, businesses, and government agencies. The PARC team gathers baseline data using a variety of methods including: resident and employer surveys; resident community engagement; commercial corridor, housing, and asset audits; and analysis of crime, violence, foreclosure, and real estate transaction data. This information is used to implement interventions addressing crime and problem properties, and to inform revitalization and engagement strategies.
Going in to year three of the PARC initiative, this presentation will focus on the evolution of collaborative leadership, governance, and administrative strategies and the challenges of designing effective communication and accountability systems that reflect the diverse interests and cultures of stakeholders.

Speakers
PK

Patrick Kennelly

Director, Center for Peacemaking, Marquette University
AW

Amber Wichowsky

Associate Professor, Marquette University


Tuesday October 10, 2017 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Colorado C

3:00pm

Getting Creative to Buy and Hire Local: Meeting Anchor Goals through Food Service Contracts (30 mins)
The University of Chicago has the unique position of being a prestigious and respected institution among some of Chicago’s most dynamic neighborhoods—unfortunately known more today for the violence and disinvestment that make the news than for their upstart businesses, vibrant cultures, and unique assets. The University has made its local community engagement a concerted part of a broader strategy, linking academic departments, research efforts, and the mandate of our Office of Civic Engagement, which serves as the ‘front door’ to communities nearest to the University. As part of that effort, The University encourages its suppliers to help the institution make good on its goals to invest, hire, and buy locally where possible. In 2016, the University rebid its campus food service management contract, which was then awarded to a major contractor who was willing to think dynamically and creatively to hire and buy locally. The contract included key local hiring and buying goals, which are reinforced by ongoing local engagement and development efforts run from across the University, like the support of a burgeoning food cluster in the Mid-South Side, from where local foods and on-campus restaurants are sourced. Supported by Next Street, an economic development consultancy specializing in anchor-driven economic development, the University continues to seek out more ways to replicate this best practice by helping major contractors to make good on local commitments, by linking efforts across the University with the goals and requirements of its major contractors.

Speakers
AB

Alyssa Berman-Cutler

Director, Community Economic Development, University of Chicago, Office of Civic Engagement
avatar for Jonathan Salzman

Jonathan Salzman

Associate, Next Street, LLC



Tuesday October 10, 2017 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Colorado J

3:00pm

How to influence legislation and update campus wide policies (30 mins)
Best Practices: Updating Campus Wide Policies
In 2014 Pace University started the process of updating their sex based misconduct policy. Contrary to standard practice, Pace formed a task force that included faculty, staff and students. Student advocates were involved at every level and helped craft an updated policy and dedicated website that was touted as a best practice example by the NYS Governor’s office.

Combating Sexual Assault on College Campuses: Governor Cuomo’s “Enough is Enough” Legislation
New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo introduced sweeping legislation directed at private universities in 2015 to combat sexual assault on college campus in tandem with a public relations campaign entitled “Enough is Enough.” The proposed legislation required all colleges to adopt a set of comprehensive procedures and guidelines, including a uniform definition of affirmative consent, a statewide amnesty policy, and expanded access to law enforcement.

The original legislation was viewed as insufficient in many areas, including language that was not gender neutral. The Office of Government and Community Relations worked closely with the NYS Senate Higher Education Chairman and NYS Assembly Higher Education Chairwoman to have the Governor’s legislation pulled from consideration and replaced with a more comprehensive bill that incorporated language and policies private universities had already adopted working closely with student advocates. The Office of Government and Community Relations participated in the drafting of the Senate bill and several areas of the now enacted legislation closely mirror Pace’s Sexual Assault Policy.

Speakers
avatar for Vanessa J. Herman

Vanessa J. Herman

AVP, Government & Community Relations, Pace University
Since February 2013, Vanessa J. Herman has served as the Assistant Vice President for Government and Community Relations at Pace University. In this role Vanessa oversees the University’s Federal, State and local government relations portfolio and is the primary point of contac... Read More →
avatar for Debbie Levesque

Debbie Levesque

Asst. Dean C'mmty Stds & Compliance, Pace University
Debbie serves as the Assistant Dean for Community Standards and Compliance. Debbie came to Pace from the University of Kentucky in 1982. She is a long time member of the administrative staff and has worked on all three of the University's campuses in a variety of roles, primarily within the Division of Student Affairs. Debbie has always been a staunch student advocate and works with her very dedicated colleagues to ensure students are well represented across the University. Debbie began her latest assignment in Community Standards in the spring of 2014. A University-wide position, Debbie's new role takes her back to her roots and provides an opportunity to travel between the campuses and to meet and work with a large number of students, staff and faculty. One of her greatest joys is reminiscing with alumni who she often meets at University events like Homecoming and a variety of University sponsored events. In addition to her work on behalf of our students, Debbie is a Pace alumna (Dyson '95, earning her M.S. in Counseling) and a Pace parent whose son is a two time Pace grad, earning his B.S. in Criminal Justice and a M.A. in Management, Public Safety and Homeland Security. Debbie is a member of ASCA Association for Student Conduct Administration, AHEAD Association on Higher Education and Disability, NASPA National Association for Student Personal Administration and ACPA American College Personnel Association... Read More →


Tuesday October 10, 2017 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Colorado I

3:00pm

The next generation of engaged scholars – How are they practicing engaged scholarship, and what do campuses need to do to support them? (45 mins)
(This session is intended to be paired with the presentation by the 2017 recipient of the Ernest A. Lynton Award for the Scholarship of Engagement). The session will contextualize the Lynton Award recipient’s work in a larger understanding of a new generation of engaged scholars who are advancing knowledge in ways that are both trans-disciplinary and asset-based, who are increasingly diverse, and who are seeking institutional homes that will allow them to thrive as engaged scholars. Participants will examine organizational policies, structures, and practice on their own campuses that support or impede community engaged scholars and collectively analyze areas of strategic change that will attract enggaed scholars and support them in ther scholarship. The goal of the workshop is to assist campuses in considering changes that will work to attract engaged scholars and consider how community engagment interacts with strategic priorities of increasng faculty diversity and the success of underserved students. The goal of the workshop is examine how the next generation of engaged scholars can help shape, and transform, the future of higher education - and how campuses can create institutional cultures in which the next generation of publically engaged scholars can thrive. Overall, the session is designed to deepen understanding of the scholarly identities, professional practices, public commitments, and aspirations of a new generation of engaged scholars.

Speakers
MJ

Mathew Johnson

Director, Associate Dean, Swearer Center for Public Service, Brown University
JS

John Saltmarsh

Program Manager, Research & Assessment, Swearer Center, Brown University
EW

Elaine Ward

Visiting Scholar and Lynton Award Coordinator, Merrimack College


Tuesday October 10, 2017 3:00pm - 3:45pm
Colorado H

3:00pm

Breaking barriers to international enrollment with innovation and common sense (60 mins)
It is especially important during challenging times in education
         to confront and eliminate those unnecessary, and often self-imposed, obstacles to success. This is especially true in the admission of international students. Beyond the external challenges of immigration rules, there are numerous “self-imposed” barriers by universities that with creativity, innovation and rethinking long-held, but now inapplicable practices can improve international admissions and the diversity of ideas and practices it brings to a U.S. campus. Such barriers include semester timing, credential recognition to include an over-reliance on third-party validation and often outdated supportive data, a “Gatekeeper’s Mentality” versus an “Access Mentality,” a lack of clarity in admission criteria and an absence of “design thinking” towards the international student and family, a “reactive” enrollment strategy versus a “proactive, data-driven” approach and a lack of process responsiveness versus competitors in the UK, Australia and Canada as well as increasingly countries like Germany and Holland that are introducing degree programs in English. The barriers will be examined and innovative solutions to overcome them offered and discussed.

Speakers
WD

William Durden

Chief Global Engagement Officer, Shorelight Education
Bill is President Emeritus of Dickinson College, where he served for 14 years, and provides key leadership to the International University Alliance (IUA), a mission-driven organization that advances the international aspirations of top-tier universities. He also holds a joint professorship (research) in the School of Education, the Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Durden was appointed to the Honorary Council of LEAD WITH LANGUAGES campaign at the request of the U.S... Read More →
GL

Gabriel Lindo-Ardila

Transfer Specialist, Florida International University
Gabriel has been in higher education for 13 years with an interest in international education. Currently, he is tasked with managing the international equivalency process to facilitate the academic transition of international students to FIU.  Prior to joining FIU, Gabriel worked... Read More →
CS

Chris Sauer

Senior Director of Enrollment Strategy, Shorelight Education
Chris works closely with enrollment, immigration and academic officers at Shorelight Education’s partner campuses. Prior to joining Shorelight, he served in the Peace Corps as an education volunteer in Botswana and for the past thirty years has held faculty and administrative positions related to International education and applied linguistics. Chris has also been active in NAFSA and TESOL and holds an MA in Applied Linguistics from Ohio... Read More →
KS

Kathryn Smith

Senior Director, Strategy and Global Projects, International University Alliance
Kathryn Smith is Senior Director, Strategy and Global Projects, of the International University Alliance, where she focuses on industry leadership initiatives in international higher education. With the IUA, Kathryn has developed a global consortium of U.S. and U.K. universities affiliating with international education partners to expand international student engagement in higher... Read More →
MV

Marie Vivas

Senior Development Manager, International Baccalaureate Organization
Marie works closely with counselors, university admissions officers and with university faculty on IB recognition issues. Marie is a former President of International ACAC and has served on several NACAC Committees. She holds an MA in French Literature from Florida State University and a Certificate in College Counseling from... Read More →


Tuesday October 10, 2017 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Colorado B

3:00pm

Change Efforts to Move Institutional Practices and Cultures from Autonomous Individualized Agendas to Collaborative Collective Trajectories (60 mins)
This panel brings together institutional leaders who have responsibilities to initiate, support, expand and sustain community engagement across the university. Facilitated by a moderator, panelists will engage in a dialogue together and with participants about challenges faced, strategies tried, successes achieved, and failures that have provided critical insights. Our dialogue will seek to draw out the diversity of experiences and perspectives as we approach our work. We will discuss the roles and efforts of institutional administrators and faculty leaders to: (a) transition faculty and institutional culture from autonomous individualized agendas to collaborative collective trajectories; (b) design programs and strategic initiatives to encourage interdisciplinary teams that align to strategic plans; and (c) track and measure institutional teaching and research activities and strengths as they align to community-identified priorities. Dr. Emily Janke (University of North Carolina Greensboro) will moderate the panel. Panelists include scholars who currently hold or have held senior administrative leadership positions at urban and metropolitan campuses, including Drs. Barbara Holland (formerly at Portland State University, Northern Kentucky University, University of Western Sydney, and the University of Sydney), Valerie Holton (Virginia Commonwealth University), Brenda Kowalewski (Weber State University), and Terri Shelton (University of North Carolina Greensboro).

Speakers
avatar for Barbara Holland

Barbara Holland

Consultant and Strategy Advisor, Holland Consulting, CUMU
avatar for Valerie Holton

Valerie Holton

Executive Editor, Senior Fellow, CUMU
Valerie Holton, PhD, LCSW is the executive editor of CUMU’s Metropolitan Universities (MUJ), a quarterly online journal for scholarship on cutting-edge issues impacting urban and metropolitan universities and colleges. Additionally, in her role as CUMU’s Senior Fellow, Valeri... Read More →
avatar for Emily Janke

Emily Janke

Dir, Institute for Community & Economic Engagement, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
institutionalizing community engagement | tracking and measuring community engagement across an institution or system | recognizing community engagement in promotion and tenure | community-university partnerships
BK

Brenda Kowalewski

Associate Provost, Weber State University
avatar for Terri Shelton

Terri Shelton

Vice Chancellor for Research & Engagement, University of North Carolina at Greensboro


Tuesday October 10, 2017 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Colorado A

3:00pm

Serving Those Who Serve: How Denver Universities Support Student Veterans (60 mins)
While more than half a million veterans, their dependents and active-duty military personnel are enrolled at institutions of higher education, 88% of student veterans drop out within the first year of pursuing a degree. Standing in the way of their degrees are issues like Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, a lack of camaraderie, and the rocky transition from a structured environment to unstructured academia. Experts from the University of Colorado Denver (CU Denver), Metropolitan State University of Denver (MSU Denver), and University of Denver (DU) will come together to discuss the role their institutions play in helping Denver student veterans transition from combat zones to classrooms to the workforce and beyond.

Speakers
avatar for Patrick Browne

Patrick Browne

Director - Veteran & Military Student Services, University of Colorado Denver
LS

Lauren Sullivan

Manager, Veteran/Military Student Center, Metropolitan State University of Denver
DV

Damon Vine

Veterans Services Coordinator, University of Denver


Tuesday October 10, 2017 3:00pm - 4:00pm
Colorado G

3:00pm

Connecting campus and community is no small thing: Meet the people who connect the dots and learn how they create synergy and impact (90 mins)
This panel discussion will encompass community outreach issues from varying perspectives. Panel members have positions that involve community outreach for their university; their experiences range from 1-3 years to over 16 years and somewhere in between. Some of their corresponding universities already have Carnegie designation and others are working towards it. They will converge to hold a frank discussion about a variety of issues that impact community engagement and forward motion such as: the challenges of outreach, sustainability, endowments, funding and funding structures; university org charts-who reports to whom, number of staff, role of the president, the provost; communication strategies, evaluation and measuring impact; engaging faculty and students (i.e., traditional, non-traditional, commuters, online students); managing leadership change on campus and/or in the community; and more. Discussion will also touch on lessons learned, forward planning and dealing with naysayers, both on campus and in the community. There will be plenty of time for Q & A and shared best practices for all those who are charged with connecting campus and community. Come to listen, learn and share.

Speakers
avatar for Diane Baldwin

Diane Baldwin

Community Partnership Coordinator, Oakland University
Our university is in the process of creating infrastructure to streamline the community work we do to have a greater coordination and opportunities for our students and faculty and greater impact in our surrounding communities. We are re-examining the ways we work with communiti... Read More →
avatar for Arlette Cepeda

Arlette Cepeda

Director, CLCE, Wagner College
MM

Marisol Morales

Director of Civic and Community Engagement, University of La Verne
Marisol Morales is the founding Director of Civic and Community Engagement at the University of La Verne, a four-year comprehensive Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI) located in Southern California. In this role she founded the Office of Civic and Community Engagement in 2013 and... Read More →
HR

Howard Rosing

Executive Director, Steans Center, DePaul University


Tuesday October 10, 2017 3:00pm - 4:30pm
Colorado D

3:30pm

Anchor Institution Economic Inclusion in Baltimore: Strategies and Collective Impact (30 mins)
Baltimore educational and medical institutions are building on their missions and taking on new roles to address the city’s deep socio-economic needs. The Baltimore Integration Partnership, a collective impact initiative of anchors institutions, funders, nonprofits, and public organizations, is supporting the development of new anchor strategies, policies, and practices that are connecting low-income Baltimore City residents, who are predominately African-American, to economic opportunity. Fourteen educational and medical institutions are participating in the BIP and are collectively and individually implementing local hiring approaches, local and minority purchasing strategies, and using capital and real estate to foster broader community benefit. This best practices presentation will highlight some of the key anchor projects and activities unfolding in Baltimore including new workforce training programs, a real estate development fund, small business development strategies, and other economic inclusion approaches driven by anchor partners. The presentation will be led by the BIP Director and the lead representative from Towson University who will not just highlight work underway but recognize some of the challenges and the work still ahead.

Speakers
avatar for Bobbie Laur

Bobbie Laur

Executive Director, CUMU Headquarters
In my role at Towson University, I manage a dynamic team and a diverse portfolio of projects that all focus on better connecting citizens and organizations with the resources of the university. We are focused on improving the quality of life and economic competitiveness for our r... Read More →
avatar for Kurt Sommer

Kurt Sommer

Director, Baltimore Integration Partnership, Association of Baltimore Area Grantmakers



Tuesday October 10, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Colorado J

3:30pm

Feeding the Engagement: Moving a Job Creation Project from Goal to Sustainability (30 mins)
In 2013 UROC launched an economic development project focused on job creation - the Northside Job Creation Team (NJCT). The goal of the NJCT is to attract public/private investments to create 1000 sustainable, living wage jobs in a 5-year period in an underserved community. To date, 625 jobs have been created.

The project is a collaboration of major stakeholders from the University, City, State, foundations, and community organizations. Graduate students from the School of Business provide research and analysis for the most viable business opportunities.

The focus of this presentation is on the necessary changes in the roles of the anchor institution and the collaborative partners over time. NJCT’s goals have been organized around the idea of living and adaptable systems that consider the patterns of relationships, how they are sustained, self-organized and how outcomes emerge. This approach has supported the project even as the number of organizations/individuals participating have grown.

This phase of the NJCT will conclude at the end of 2018. We predict we will exceed the goal of 1000 jobs. However, 1000 jobs will not close the employment gap; 4100 jobs is the target for this geographic area to reach parity with the rest of the city. Faced with the task of considering how a university placed-based unit looks to the future of this work, we will present a timeline that captures the changes in how the project has adapted and succeeded, and a prediction of the next steps that will allow for sustainability.

Speakers
avatar for Heidi Barajas

Heidi Barajas

Associate Professor and Chair, OLPD, University of Minnesota
JD

James De Sota

Director of Administration and Projects, Robert J. Jones Urban Research and Outreach-Engagement Center


Tuesday October 10, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Colorado C

3:30pm

Social Justice Pedagogy and University/Community Partnerships: How to Critically Engage Youth in Activism (30 mins)
Syracuse, New York is ranked as one of the areas in the United States with the highest concentration of Black and Latino poverty. This has been a catalyst in the need for sustaining effective and mutually beneficial collaborations within the community and the University. Syracuse University’s Intergroup Dialgoue (IGD) program has created and sustained a partnership with the Syracuse City School District incorporating a high school credited course in the curriculum; Cultural Voices and an after school program, Lit Arts. Cultural Voices is a twenty-week course based on dialogic pedagogy and adapted from a college curriculum, where students are challenged and supported in engaging difficult dialogues on race, racism, culture, and community in the educational and social context of an alternative urban school, where our most recent collaboration has taken place. Lit Arts provides further opportunity for students to engage in experiential learning outside of the school day in a way that enhances the development of academic and civic identities – specifically through dialogue and art-based curriculum. This collaboration is productive for both educators and learners and has proven to be beneficial to the larger Syracuse Community. Using the example of Cultural Voices and Lit Arts this presentation will expand on ways that such social justice pedagogy inspires youth activism and nurtures the civic engagement of educators and community members. The presenters will engage participants in an exchange on how bridging relationships across the community and the University is both constructive and critical.

Speakers
DJ

Dellareese Jackson

Graduate Assistant/ Part time Instructor, Democratizing Knowledge/ Intergroup Dialogue
avatar for Diane Romo

Diane Romo

Graduate Research Assistant, Intergroup Dialogue Program, Syracuse University


Tuesday October 10, 2017 3:30pm - 4:00pm
Denver 5

3:30pm

Anchor 101: Getting Started with the Anchor Dashboard (45 mins)
As anchor institutions, metropolitan and urban universities bring powerful benefits to their neighboring communities by aligning their resources, scholarship and business operations with their public mission. In this workshop, representatives from the Anchor Dashboard Learning Cohort will introduce participants to how institutions of higher education can be more intentional anchor institutions. The Anchor Dashboard, developed collaboratively with the support of Annie E. Casey and by The Democracy Collaborative and cohort of six universities – Buffalo State, Cleveland State, Drexel University (Philadelphia), Rutgers University-Newark, University of Missouri-St. Louis (UMSL), and Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) in Richmond – is a ground-breaking multiyear effort to meet this key need. This workshop will provide a brief background on universities as place-based institutions contributing to the health and well-being of their communities through their core activities and mission. Using the Anchor Dashboard as a framework, participants will be introduced to the basics of anchor institutions and be guided through a process to identify how to begin or extend this effort in their own institutions.

Speakers
JF

Joanne Ferroni

Director of University and Community Partnerships, Drexel University
KG

Karl Guenther

Community Development Specialist, University of Missouri - St. Louis
JR

Julian Rogers

Director of Community Partnerships, Cleveland State University
avatar for Emily Sladek

Emily Sladek

Senior Program Associate for Higher Education, The Democracy Collaborative
Assisting with the New Economy Action Project at CommonBound in Buffalo, NY 2016


Tuesday October 10, 2017 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Colorado I

3:45pm

Effective University Partnerships with Native American Communities: Stories from Montana (30 mins)

Montana is ranked among the top 25 percent of states with Native American populations. The state has seven reservations and a population of about six percent Native Americans statewide. Native Americans are the largest historically underrepresented group of students at the University of Montana. The colonization of Native American populations has an impact on historical trauma and contemporary outcomes like the average length of time for undergraduate graduation, retention and advancement of Science Technology Engineering and Math faculty, and the over incarceration of Native American women (36 percent of Montana’s women in state prison). Understanding the factors contributing to longer student graduation timelines, faculty success, and over-incarceration rates require engagement approaches that are culturally grounded in Indigenous research and practice methods for research and program evaluation with Native American participants. Kirkness & Barnhardt (1991) outline the 4 R’s of Indigenous people in higher education that inform a path to creating a synthesized approach to teaching, research and service by emphasizing respect, relevance, reciprocity, and responsibility. The presentation will feature stories describing why and how to focus on the 4 R’s in collaborations with Native American communities. The impacts of learning with and from Native American students resulted in developing research projects that inform the development of trainings for faculty and administrators co-lead by an undergraduate student and Assistant Professor, supportive services for women who were incarcerated, and a 1.7 million dollar National Science Foundation grant focused on mentoring Native American faculty.


Speakers
LW

Laurie Walker

Associate Professor, University of Montana


Tuesday October 10, 2017 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Colorado H

4:00pm

Building bridges: Community and regional engagement that transcends international borders. CETYS Presentation

For over half a century, CETYS has contributed to the development of human capital and well-grounded individuals, agents of change that strengthen the competitiveness of the region, raise the quality of life, and improve the social fabric of those living along the Mexico-US border. Through this presentation, CETYS President will share the experience of an institution that has evolved from a continued education provider to one involved in graduate programs tailored to specific industry clusters, joint research projects, corporate linkage activities, and service learning programs, all robust examples of community engagement. CETYS impact beyond Mexico is complemented with its commitment to serving U.S. citizens from the Southern California region –as well as DACA students- through U.S. accredited programs and by offering financial aid (FAFSA) and support. This has consolidated CETYS reach and impact on the neighboring communities of Southern California and represents an example of rich and meaningful engagement.


Speakers
CG

Carlos Garcia

Director, Institutional Relations, CETYS University/IENAC
Dr. Garcia is the Director for Institutional Relations and a member of the President’s Senior Staff at CETYS University, an internationally accredited University System in Mexico. He has been involved in external relations for more than 20 years, having served as local Director of Development, System Director for Advancement, Campus Dean, and currently at the head of Institutional Relations overseeing Alumni Relations, Communications and Board Development. He is an A.C.E. Fellow, the second Mexican to be chosen for that prestigious program in 50 years, a senior volunteer to CASE Latin America, an alumnus of The Fundraising School, a has served as member of numerous boards and service organizations, including the local chapters of the Mexican Red Cross, Caracol museum, The Ensenada Rotary Club, among others. Dr... Read More →


Tuesday October 10, 2017 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Colorado B

4:00pm

Building Capacity for Systems Change through Community Partnership (30 mins)
Engaging in sustainable policy and systems change in Milwaukee, WI, one of the most segregated and impoverished central city areas in America, requires strong partnerships based on trust. This session will describe the growth, trials and successes of a decade-long partnership between Marquette University, Milwaukee Public Schools, Medical College of Wisconsin, United Neighborhood Centers of Milwaukee (UNCOM) and the Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Milwaukee (BGCGM), focused on policy and systems change to enhance community wellness in Milwaukee’s central city. It will highlight the use of neighborhood level cultivation of partners and train-the-trainer model capacity building via Community Engaged Research (CEnR), resulting in successful creation and adoption of novel wellness policy focused on nutrition, vending, physical activity, built environment and curriculum for UNCOM sites, serving over 50,000 youth and families in Milwaukee. The use of this success to develop grant-funded systems change in Milwaukee Public Schools through development of a novel support system for students struggling with wellness using the Response to Intervention (RtI) system applied to physical education programming will also be discussed. Central threads of both programs include bi-directional communication and community driven policies and programming, with unique dual focus on both the segregation present and considerable ethnic, racial, and socioeconomic diversity present in Milwaukee’s central city. Discussion and exchange of best practices and novel applications/ideas will follow.

Speakers
avatar for Christopher Simenz

Christopher Simenz

Clinical Professor, Exercise Science, Marquette University
Dr. Simenz currently works in a collaborative, community engaged research (CEnR) team to study obesity reduction/prevention, wellness, food security, homelessness and health access/navigation focused on underserved populations in Milwaukee's central city. Additionally, he is enga... Read More →


Tuesday October 10, 2017 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Denver 5

4:00pm

Development of the Latina/o Well-Being Research Initiative: Best Practices and Lessons Learned (30 mins)
At Marquette University, the Latina/o Well-Being Research Initiative (LWRI) was developed to deepen community engagement and advance academic scholarship pertaining to the promotion of well-being among Latina/o youth and adults living in Milwaukee. This initiative focused on bringing together community stakeholders and researchers to identify and develop culturally-relevant research projects specific to pressing issues within Milwaukee. Together with key community partners, administrators and other faculty and staff, the LWRI co-directors have embarked on the process of creating an effective and enduring research partnership across several organizations and entities, a process which has not been done before at this level within the community. Over the past years LWRI has reached several key milestones, including: the development of an Action Group comprised of community and academics, the articulation of a collaboration model, the compilation of existing data about well-being among Latina/os in the community, and the development of the infrastructure (e.g., business plan, promotion plan) needed to sustain and grow the work of the initiative. This presentation will provide a description of effective strategies, both within the university and in the community, that have enabled growth over the past years. In addition, valuable lessons learned about collaboration models and styles will be discussed.

Speakers
LE

Lisa Edwards

Professor, Marquette University
LT

Lucas Torres

Associate Professor, Marquette University


Tuesday October 10, 2017 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Colorado G

4:30pm

MUJ Editorial Board Meeting (Invite Only)
Tuesday October 10, 2017 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Colorado C

4:30pm

New and Prospective Member Happy Hour and Collaboratory Introduction (invite only)

Invite only

We hope you’ll join us to learn more about how you and your institution can benefit from CUMU membership—whether you’ve just joined this past year or are considering joining. Our executive director and several board members will be on hand to welcome you and answer questions about how to engage with us.

Also, learn more about Collaboratory, software that is empowering higher education institutions to track, analyze, share and strengthen their community engagement and public service. Meet the creators as well as early adopters. We hope to see you there!

This event is sponsored by


Tuesday October 10, 2017 4:30pm - 5:30pm
The Platte Room in Propect's Urban Kitchen and Bar

5:30pm

Signature Reception, Sponsored by the University of Denver

Join the University of Denver team for a relaxed and fun networking reception on the rooftop of Tamayo. Local celebrity chef Richard Sandoval will provide a light fare menu, including the ‘Best Guacamole in Denver,’ along with a signature drink. Located in the heart of the popular Larimer Square neighborhood, there are plenty of options for dining and experiencing Denver afterward.

Getting There: CUMU will provide 25 person coaches that will circulate beginning at 5:15 pm and ending at 7:30 pm. Tamayo is also a short 15 minute walk from our hotel. The free 16th Street train also provides quick access and a great opportunity to experience downtown Denver along the way.

This reception hosted by University of Denver.


Tuesday October 10, 2017 5:30pm - 7:30pm
Tomayo 1400 Larimer St, Denver, CO 80202
 
Wednesday, October 11
 

7:00am

Anchor Network Focus Group
This is the first year that CUMU has officially called for proposals focusing on the role of colleges and universities as anchor institutions. We are very pleased to have 65 presenters submit proposals on anchor and economic development. It is clear that there is a growing movement in higher education to reimagine the role our institutions can play in the communities we call home.  To support this growing interest in anchor institution work, CUMU has partnered with The Democracy Collaborative, one of the premier organizations supporting anchor institutions to better direct their economic and intellectual power to build reciprocal and symbiotic relationships with local communities through inclusive hiring, investment and  procurement strategies to name a few. MORE INFO  

Wednesday October 11, 2017 7:00am - 8:45am
Colorado B

7:30am

CUMU Research Network Meeting -- Invite Only
Wednesday October 11, 2017 7:30am - 8:45am
Colorado D

7:30am

Poster Presentation and Networking Breakfast
The final day of the conference opens with the poster presentation and networking breakfast. Enjoy breakfast, catch up with colleagues, and learn about important work being done at 11 campuses across the country from 20 presenters.

Wednesday October 11, 2017 7:30am - 9:00am
Colorado Ballrooms

7:30am

Black Male and/or Latino Going to School, Going to Jail: The Public Schools to Prison Pipeline in the United States (90 mins)
In possession of the largest prison population in the world, the United States currently locks up 2.3 million people. Disproportionately warehousing communities of color and poor people, research support that one in nine African American males between ages of 20-34 are behind bars. These numbers for these young Black men are as a direct result of public policy that is often popularly named “tough on crime” where minorities disproportionately bear the brunt of “tough on crime” polices such as mandatory sentencing, three strikes laws and the death penalty. For example, while Black males and Latinos each account for seventeen percent of U.S. K-12 schools enrollment, they respectively comprise thirty percent and twenty percent of all twelfth grade suspensions and expulsions. What is important and the purpose of this presentation is that focusing on punishing youth minority has blurred the pedagogical distinctions between Americans education and the criminal justice systems. In this presentation, I explore the increasingly symbiotic relationship between U.S. public schools and the nation’s criminal justice system and more specifically, I examine the space between public schools and the U.S. penal system and both identify and analyze ways that institutional factors such as the school curriculum, discipline policies, and testing practices are consistently enacted in public schools to push groups of students out of classrooms and toward prisons in a type of school-to-prison pipeline despite the good intentions of educators and others.

Speakers
CH

Cleveland Hayes

University of LaVerne


Wednesday October 11, 2017 7:30am - 9:00am
Colorado Ballrooms

7:30am

Building Reciprocal Partnerships for Long-term Impact through Co+Build: The YMCA Case Study (90 mins)
Wentworth Institute of Technology has a long and rich history of engaging its neighbors in the local community to strengthen “town/gown” relationships and to create long-term partnerships with community residents, organizations, and businesses. Wentworth, one of New England’s premiere design and engineering institutions, encourages students to not only master their area of technical expertise, but also to bring their passion and talent to bear on real-world problems and make a difference in the community. Through Co+Build, a community-focused design and construction program that brings urban issues to the forefront and helps to create more vibrant neighborhoods, Wentworth students, faculty, and community members work with the community to complete hands-on neighborhood projects from initial design phases to completion, helping to graduate more engaged members of our society.

Enter YMCA of Greater Boston. Founded in 1851 as America’s first Y, the YMCA of Greater Boston strengthens the Greater Boston community through a focus on youth development, healthy living and social responsibility. Today, the YMCA of Greater Boston stays true to its roots as a values-driven, volunteer-led, human service organization strengthening children, families and communities.

Through multiple innovative approaches to shared spaces and capital improvement projects, the Y and Wentworth have developed a reciprocal partnership focused on providing additional benefits for the City of Boston. This poster session will reflect on the best practices for long-term, reciprocal, town/gown collaborations through past authentic and successful design/build projects and the lineup of future service learning opportunities facing the partnership.

Speakers
avatar for Erik Miller

Erik Miller

Director, Community & Learning Partnerships, Wentworth Institute of Technology


Wednesday October 11, 2017 7:30am - 9:00am
Colorado Ballrooms

7:30am

Building Trust Between Labor and Design: Cal State LA Fashion Design Students collaborate with Los Angeles Garment Workers. (90 mins)
The poster board will address a growing relationship between Fashion Fiber and Materials students and the Los Angeles Garment Worker Center. Presenting outcomes of two student centered community engaged projects:

1. CREATIVO: a monthly workshop held for garment workers at the Los Angeles Garment Workers Center. These workshops provide skills training for garment workers so they can advance within the garment industry. A senior student was selected to assist, develop and teach the workers. He worked with organizers to recruit garment worker for monthly meetings, , informing workers about the center, and its resources. The student developed an apron project, which allowed the GWC to provide a first aide kit, safety goggles, and other tools. This apron is used to activate conversations from worker to worker in the factory about the GWC and the services it provides.

2. A multi lingual picture dictionary, addressing workers’ rights and industry terms. This idea was implemented as a final project for ART 3110 Social Engagement for Fashion Fiber and Materials. The students began the process by meeting with the workers and brainstorming about what the workers would like for content, how it could be used, what the size should be, how it can best serve the workers. Students will produce 6 different versions of the dictionary and final presentations will be made by the end of each semester.


These projects were funded by the Center for engagement, service and the public good.

Speakers
CL

Carole Lung

Faculty, California State University, Los Angeles


Wednesday October 11, 2017 7:30am - 9:00am
Colorado Ballrooms

7:30am

Engage Your Brand (90 mins)
Community engagement is a well-established strategy for enhancing student learning and faculty scholarship, and a recognized principle for guiding institutional behavior and organizational citizenship, but few universities capitalize on their community engagement work to elevate their brand identity within competitive and often congested higher education markets in urban and metropolitan regions. In this session, presenters will share the case story of an urban university that markets select aspects of its community engagement activities to advance a brand identity that resonates with key stakeholder groups, appeals to prospective student audiences and reinforces an organizational identity that affirms its role as a public, urban institution and distinguishes it from its market competitors.

An integrated marketing campaign that incorporates community engagement requires theme reinforcement at key points in the strategy and implementation phases: concept development, buy-in, creative phase, execution, advertising buys, promotions, earned and paid media. Presenters will share key insights garnered at each of these stages and share examples of the campaign products, including print and digital media.

Speakers
avatar for Poh Lin Khoo

Poh Lin Khoo

Director of Marketing and Communication, Metro State University
Poh Lin Khoo provides leadership to generate enrollment, advance brand, and build partnerships as the Metropolitan State University Marketing and Communications Director. | | Poh Lin is a marketing professional with 20 years of experience creating successful marketing and c... Read More →
avatar for Greg Mellas

Greg Mellas

Director of Inst for Comm Engagement & Scholarship, Metropolitan State University
Greg Mellas has 20 years of experience working in community engagement, outreach and development in domestic and international settings. As director of Metropolitan State University’s Institute for Community Engagement and Scholarship, Greg leads the university’s civic and co... Read More →


Wednesday October 11, 2017 7:30am - 9:00am
Colorado Ballrooms

7:30am

Environmental Resources Center: Connecting with the Community through a Center of Excellence (90 mins)
The Environmental Resources Center, or ERC, is one of the Centers of Excellence at Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne. The mission of the ERC is to promote the understanding and conservation of the natural resources of the region through scientific research, educational opportunities, and outreach. The Center provides a platform for enhancing the visibility of the university in the community; a tangible resource for the public on topics of ecology, the environment and sustainability; and increased opportunities for collaboration among faculty and students from different disciplines within the university. The ERC has had many successes and also challenges, and in my presentation I will explore both in the context of community engagement. Opportunities and challenges can be intertwined. The bulk of support for ERC activity comes from contracts and awards for applied research and technical services. Consequently, staff time and resources are largely dedicated to completing projects, and thus discretionary funds and time are limited. Growth and expansion into new areas requires resources and risk, and there may be delays in tangible benefits to the university, so administration must decide how to apply limited resources to such enterprises. Staffing in the form student internships and graduate student projects builds team size and provides wonderful opportunities for the students, but students are not yet polished in their professions, particularly in realms of political interaction, and so need more time to accomplish tasks and possibly close supervision to avoid stepping on toes. Reaching collaboratively across academic silos continues to be challenging.

Speakers
avatar for Bruce Kingsbury

Bruce Kingsbury

Associate Dean, Indiana - Purdue University Fort Wayne
As relates to my presentation, I direct our Environmental Resources Center, promoting the understanding and conservation of our natural resources. This endeavor emerged from my active research program focusing on wildlife ecology and conservation, particularly snakes (!). In my... Read More →


Wednesday October 11, 2017 7:30am - 9:00am
Colorado Ballrooms

7:30am

Evaluating the impact of service learning on non-profit organizations (90 mins)
Service Learning is an experiential, collaborative method of teaching which takes a project-based approach. Service learning projects promote academic learning while meeting the needs of the community. The needs of the community are addressed through partnering with non-profit organizations and basing the project around a current need identified by that organization. The distinction between service learning and volunteering is important and is indicated by the participation of students as part of their curriculum. Since the projects are part of the students’ curriculum, they can take various forms that answer identified needs in unique ways.
The Metropolitan Area Coalition for Service Learning (MASCL) is an organization which consists of service learning representatives from almost all the major colleges in the Omaha metro area. The impact of service learning on students has been established to be positive and enriching through pre- and post-service learning surveys conducted by the colleges on students. However, the direct impact of service learning on the community partners has not been formally evaluated.
Researchers began the evaluation of the impact of service learning on community partners by conducting focus groups and creating a survey. Community partners rated their satisfaction with the partnership and decision making, various aspects related to capacity building, and the effectiveness of the group. They also provided responses to a series of open-ended questions. The results of the survey indicate that service learning is contributing positively to the overall capacity of community organizations. Conclusions and recommendations for future directions will be discussed.

Speakers
RE

Rebecca Erks

University of Nebraska at Omaha
ST

Sheridan Trent

Graduate Assistant, University of Nebraska at Omaha


Wednesday October 11, 2017 7:30am - 9:00am
Colorado Ballrooms

7:30am

Mind Matters Town Halls: A High Impact, Collaborative GE Experience (90 mins)
New civic learning requirements in general education courses at Cal State LA enabled faculty to collaborate with Student Life staff to bring high impact practices and engaged learning to first year students. Students participate in problem solving town halls focused on mental wellness and community based learning. This transformational collaboration enhances the Mind Matters initiative on inner well being led by the University President and helps improve the campus climate and positively impact the academic success of new students. Presenters will discuss this high impact practice, which combines classroom education and student engagement activities. Over 700 students participated in the program in its pilot year and participation doubled to 1500 this year. Presenters will detail the problem-solving assignment and logistics of the Town Hall as a model of a collaborative process to strengthen engagement at Cal State LA, an often challenging task for an urban, metropolitan university. Kuh (2008) indicates that historically underserved students benefit more from high impact practices, but are less likely to participate in them. At Cal State LA, 70% of students are underrepresented, 64% are first generation, and 97% receive some form of financial aid. Because the town halls are embedded within a required course, this ensures that underrepresented students with high need participate in those experiences. This experience helps de-stigmatize mental wellness issues, but also enables students to assist peers and family members which can have an even larger impact within our communities. Lastly, assessment data of this Town Hall experience will be shared.

Speakers
avatar for Nancy Wada-McKee

Nancy Wada-McKee

VP for Student Life, California State University, Los Angeles
avatar for Michael Willard

Michael Willard

Faculty Director of Service Learning, Cal State LA


Wednesday October 11, 2017 7:30am - 9:00am
Colorado Ballrooms

7:30am

Mobilizing Communities Against Underage Drinking: A Collective Impact (90 mins)
Tackling Youth Substance Abuse (TYSA) is a cross-sector coalition that leverages the power of collective impact to address alarming rates of youth and young adult substance misuse on Staten Island. Historically, rates of underage drinking, as well as social approval regarding alcohol consumption, have been high in Staten Island communities compared to the remainder of New York City. In response to these statistics, TYSA engaged a diverse spectrum of stakeholders including local business owners, local government, parents, youth, law enforcement, service providers, school personnel, researchers, faith based leaders, and community based prevention organizations to strategically plan and implement a comprehensive initiative addressing alcohol consumption among youth. This multipronged approach targeted parental and peer approval as well as retail access and availability of alcoholic beverages to minors. Further, TYSA worked at the policy level to increase accountability of alcohol retailers in regards to advertisements targeting youth as well as lax identification practices. By securing the buy in of TYSA’s strong and diverse partners and empowering youth to speak out against alcohol advertisements in their communities, Staten Island observed reductions in alcohol misuse among youth. As emerging drug trends arise, TYSA continues to advocate for attention to be paid to the public health implications of alcohol misuse across age groups.

Speakers
AA

Adrienne Abbate

Staten Island Partnership for Community Wellness
JR

Jazmin Rivera

TYSA Program Manager, Staten Island partnership for Community Wellness


Wednesday October 11, 2017 7:30am - 9:00am
Colorado Ballrooms

7:30am

Moving Toward Collective Impact: The Volunteer Program Assessment (90 mins)
Volunteers are essential to the operation of many organizations, contributing 7.9 billion hours of service and saving $184 billion for nonprofits in the United States in 2015 (Corporation for National and Community Service, 2016). Unfortunately, many organizations with volunteer programs experience challenges in retaining their volunteer workforce. Since 2002, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (2016) has reported an increasingly bleak picture, with the rate of volunteering in the United States stagnating or declining each year. It is currently at an unprecedented low, with only 24.9% of citizens volunteering in 2015.
The Volunteer Program Assessment (VPA), an organization operating out of six urban universities, seeks to help address this issue by providing organizations with a free assessment and consultation service to identify strengths, growth areas, and evidence-based recommendations for volunteer programs. To maximize the effectiveness of VPA’s mission to help struggling volunteer programs across the United States, the organization has adopted, out of necessity, a collective impact approach. Although not initially developed as a collective impact (CI) effort, the program currently exemplifies many of the characteristics of a CI initiative, which have been instrumental in expanding reach to a larger number of organizations. We examine VPA’s alignment with collective impact strategies, discuss how this has benefited the organization, and outline how VPA will continue to strategically move toward adopting a collective impact approach.

Speakers
avatar for Joseph Allen

Joseph Allen

Associate Professor, University of Nebraska at Omaha
ST

Sheridan Trent

Graduate Assistant, University of Nebraska at Omaha


Wednesday October 11, 2017 7:30am - 9:00am
Colorado Ballrooms

7:30am

Northeast Indiana’s Multi-university, Community-based Partnership for Engagement (90 mins)
The IPFW Office of Engagement launched in January 2006 as a four-way partnership between the Fort Wayne campus, Purdue University, Indiana University and the northeast Indiana business community. Using the intellectual and physical resources of the university partners, this office serves to promote positive outcomes in northeast Indiana in three areas:
• Economic development – growth of high-skill, high-wage jobs
• Workforce development – education of the incumbent and emerging workforces
• Community development – contribution to “quality of place”.
The Office of Engagement develops collaborations between regional companies, government and community groups and the faculty and students on any or all of the three campuses. With the focus on northeast Indiana as an economic region, having the complimentary resources of three institutions, a comprehensive portfolio of services is available to our community partners. Tactically, the office has some very specific areas in which we facilitate community access to the university partners:
• Research
• Technical assistance / Faculty expertise / Student projects
• Intellectual property
• University programs, seminars, and networking opportunities
• Workforce development / Corporate training
• Internships / Co-ops / Student hiring / Service learning
Over the past 11 years, the office has served a portfolio of over 700 businesses, with a success rate of over 45% in creating value-added collaborations. Faculty are engaged in collaborative research projects with regional businesses and regularly have multiple companies engaging faculty annually through the Purdue TAP program and student academic projects. The poster presentation will illustrate various campus engagements.

Speakers
CD

Carl Drummond

Indiana University-Purdue University, Fort Wayne
avatar for Sean Ryan

Sean Ryan

Director, Office of Engagement, Indiana University Purdue University Fort Wayne (IPFW)
The IPFW Office of Engagement was jointly created by IPFW, Purdue University, Indiana University, and the northeast Indiana business community in 2005. The office serves as a community partner in key regional economic development, strategic planning and workforce development ini... Read More →


Wednesday October 11, 2017 7:30am - 9:00am
Colorado Ballrooms

7:30am

Specifications Grading: Development, Course Integration, and Colleague Collaboration (90 mins)
Modeled from “Specifications Grading: Restoring Rigor, Motivating Students, and Saving Faculty Time” (Nilson, 2015), this presentation will share faculty experiences in developing a grading specification system and integrating this evaluative paradigm into their courses. Details will be provided on how specifications related to the outcomes of a junior-level Research Methods course were developed, how ‘Specs Sheets’ and examples were created for each assignment within the course, and how the assignment draft process provides students with an opportunity to revise their drafts, based on peer review and class guidance, before submission of the assignment based on the required specifications. Details will also be provided on how students in a freshmen-level Religion course were given agency in setting their own goals for the class as well as how assignments were redesigned to use specifications grading rather than traditional rubrics. This presentation will also include the process of developing specifications for a Senior Seminar (Capstone) course which incorporates an applied undergraduate research immersion experience with plans to use individual student grade contracts. Finally, collaboration in this process will be highlighted as best practices have been identified and shared among faculty with support from the faculty development center. By implementing this paradigm, the faculty believe that students have clear expectations for class performance and more motivation for their learning, while upholding high academic standards.

Speakers
MG

Megan Granquist

Associate Professor of Kinesiology, University of La Verne
avatar for Zandra Wagoner

Zandra Wagoner

University Chaplain, University of La Verne


Wednesday October 11, 2017 7:30am - 9:00am
Colorado Ballrooms

7:30am

Student Community Engagement Award Process and Selection: the IUPUI Plater Medallion (90 mins)
The William M. Plater Civic Engagement Medallion was established in 2006 to honor graduates of Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis (IUPUI) who have excelled in their commitment to communities through activities such as service learning, volunteerism, community/social issue advocacy, community work-study, and political engagement. This highly competitive recognition (just fifty medallions are awarded each year) honors undergraduate, graduate and professional students who have shown an exemplary commitment to their communities, and who have displayed personal growth and a positive community impact as a result of their experiences. This interactive presentation will review the origin of the award, the application, and the selection process for the Plater Medallion, with an emphasis on artifacts that student applicants provide and how scoring criteria has been determined and administered. Presenters will discuss the involvement of faculty, staff, and community partners in the selection process, examples of student civic outcomes articulated in the applications, and efforts by IUPUI to invite a diverse representation of applicants. Participants will have an opportunity to review and score a sample application by using several rubrics including an overall application rubric and the Civic Minded Graduate essay rubric. Presenters welcome feedback from attendees regarding the review and selection process of the award.

Speakers
avatar for Lorrie Brown

Lorrie Brown

Director of Student and Staff Engagement, Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis
TH

Tom Hahn

Director of Research and Program Evaluation, Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis


Wednesday October 11, 2017 7:30am - 9:00am
Colorado Ballrooms

7:30am

Studying Student Spending: Privacy, Technology, and Impact (90 mins)
Civic engagement has long considered the impact of spending (Harkavy and Zuckerman, 1999). Rarely has the same type of analysis been applied to student spending. This panel addresses several key elements in attempting to study the impact of student spending: 1) privacy challenges that come with the collecting of study student spending data 2) technological infrastructure for collecting student spending data and 3) connects the analysis of this data back to the university context and civic engagement more broadly.

Speakers
SD

Stephen Danley

Assistant Professor, Rutgers-Camden University


Wednesday October 11, 2017 7:30am - 9:00am
Colorado Ballrooms

7:30am

Time, Impact, Purpose, Place: Distilling the Student Civic Engagement Experience in the 21st Century (90 mins)
Since 2011, Rutgers-Camden Civic Scholars have epitomized the civically and academically student at our campus, still while often holding part-time work, participating in other campus commitments, commuting to campus, and managing a full academic course load. How do these students successfully engage? How can they find meaning in civic engagement in the context of broadly busy lives? As civic engagement, experiential learning, and other beyond-the-classroom opportunities have become a learning standard, so have the challenges in assessing the strength of experience and articulation of development as these students weld their academic and professional trajectory in an increasingly connected yet refracted world.

The TIPP Model - i.e., Time, Impact, Purpose, and Place - is designed for the 21st century college student to assume a real-time perspective of their experience through these fundamental concepts, establishing a sense of civic urgency and productivity that connects with academics while contextualizing the various threads of their individual experience. Students typically have a broad but undefined sense of their purpose, little sense of impact, a trained sense of time, and a fraught sense of place when entering experiential or civic engagement learning opportunities. TIPP inspires students to reflect on the meaning of their work and service, the limiters of their engagement, and how outcomes can be established at any point of their service. Practitioners from any academic unit are encouraged to share this simple philosophy to help students calibrate their long-term goals and create pragmatic pathways towards those outcomes.

Speakers
CC

Chris Countryman

Program Coordinator - Civic Scholars, Rutgers University--Camden


Wednesday October 11, 2017 7:30am - 9:00am
Colorado Ballrooms

7:30am

Trans-classroom between the University and Community Library: A Service-Learning Project (90 mins)
Since its first establishment in 2010, the service-learning project, Volunteer-lecturer program, purposely creates the concept of a trans-classroom communication between the class and the community library. The major medium for establishing this particular “trans-classroom” connection is the very art of cinema. The teacher uses her courses which include Film Appreciation, and Film Theory and Criticism to serve the community library where is equipped with a state-of-the-art theater and screens films regularly. The operation of the project is that the teacher recruits volunteer students in her class to present the after-screening talk to the local audiences and exchanges the analysis with them for a total of eight oral presentations per semester. The students are supposed to apply the theories that they have learned through the lectures in the film class and have displayed their knowledge to the audiences who are not familiar with the cinematic readings. The Shen-Po library, the institution we serve, is located at the neighborhood of the Providence University, a catholic school that is well received in Taiwan for the Service-Learning projects, and the teacher of this Volunteer-lecturer project has received a national award for her long-term engagement to the community service.

With this protocol of trans-classroom, the teacher aims to produce an efficient, yet pleasant learning environment that ultimately will improve students’ learning attitude from passive to active, and more significantly, to practice the virtue of altruism, making contribution to the society. The team has also successfully extended the service to the local school and other institution.

Speakers
avatar for Ming-may Jessie Chen

Ming-may Jessie Chen

Assistant professor, Providence University


Wednesday October 11, 2017 7:30am - 9:00am
Colorado Ballrooms

7:30am

University Influence in Urban Food Systems (90 mins)
Entire urban university communities, with a multitude of internal and external influences, are addressing food system opportunities and challenges at local, regional, and global levels. To address food system complexity, urban university faculty, staff, and students are engaging with a variety of stakeholders. In addition to focusing on the fundamental need of feeding the growing world population, urban universities are recognizing the value of individual expertise and the collective capacity to nourish the people, the environment, and the economy.

Diverse perspectives have led to definitions of food systems that often include descriptors such as local, regional, global, community, sustainable, resilient, inclusive, equitable, healthy, or culturally relevant. Each of the terms carries specific meaning and context. Across campus, initiatives and conversations about food have the capacity to bring out the full potential of the university. From dining services and real estate to academic units, student life, advancement, engagement, and public relations, urban universities influence urban food systems. In addition to single-factor interests, transdisciplinary investigation of food systems have progressed beyond compartmentalized approaches to explore multi-dimensional aspects.

The poster presentation builds upon the themed issue of Metropolitan Universities journal on urban university contributions to food system teaching and learning; research and innovation; outreach and engagement; and resource stewardship.

Speakers
JF

Julie Fox

Associate Chair, The Ohio State University, Dept. of Extension


Wednesday October 11, 2017 7:30am - 9:00am
Colorado Ballrooms

7:30am

University-School Partnership: Preparing Teachers in Classrooms (90 mins)
The presenters, university instructor and kindergarten teacher, will describe their experiences in a university-school partnership that involves a yearlong clinical residency. The scholar-practitioners in this study were brought into a collaborative student-teaching residency program through a grant that established district partnerships with an urban university. The university presenter took on the role of site-coordinator for the partner district located 20 miles from the urban campus. In that setting, she supports emerging teachers in either a two-day a week field experience or a five-day a week final student teaching experience. This case study will provide an overview of the program and the core elements that include shared governance meetings, observation data from walkthroughs and performance assessments, co-teaching, mentor teacher monthly professional development meetings, and data collection and analysis for decision making at the university and K-6 campus. The case study will include lessons learned by emerging teachers and mentor teachers during implementation of the pilot. The long range goal is to collect data over five years to determine the value of a residency program for the K-6 students, mentor teachers, and emerging teachers as compared to a traditional one-semester student teaching experience.

Speakers
CJ

Christi Jimenez

Kindergarten Teacher, Mackey Elementary, Mesquite ISD
GM

Glenda Moss

Professor, University of North Texas at Dallas
Yearlong Student Teaching Residency | Experiential Learning | Multicultural learning


Wednesday October 11, 2017 7:30am - 9:00am
Colorado Ballrooms

7:30am

Urban Students: Giving Our Students the Education they Deserve (90 mins)
Our children deserve an education which emphasizes the public in public education and teaches them that public service supersedes private opulence, institutional fairness triumphs individual greed and the common good prevails over group xenophobia. We submit that as a society, we already know what kind of education our children deserve—our survival as a nation and world depends on that education----and yet, paradoxically, as we will argue below, and as demonstrated clearly by our historical record and represented by the absent presence of equity-oriented education reflected in the epigraphs above, it is no unfortunate accident or unintended coincidence that our children have yet to receive the education they deserve.

Speakers
CH

Cleveland Hayes

University of LaVerne


Wednesday October 11, 2017 7:30am - 9:00am
Colorado Ballrooms

7:30am

Registration
Wednesday October 11, 2017 7:30am - 2:00pm
Colorado Ballrooms

9:00am

Black Men as Agents of Change in Children’s Literacy Success: A Study of the Effects of Volunteer Readers and Early Literacy Behaviors in a Pediatric Clinic Waiting Room (30 mins)
A transdisciplinary team (early literacy education, pediatrics, counseling, and public health) at the University of Louisville, alongside community partners, understands that inequities in children’s literacy learning is one piece of broader systemic educational inequities related to poverty and deficit assumptions about families and children in poverty, particularly families and children of color. We know that:
1) Many children from minority populations (particularly Black boys) experience opportunity gaps that lead to disparities in reading proficiency and other factors of life quality that persist into adulthood (Milner, 2012).
2) Access to books, and hearing quality literature read aloud by caring adults in culture-rich and print-rich environments is critical to all children’s literacy learning.
3) Pediatric clinics are community sites that reach all children, and pediatricians can offer parents and other caregivers trusted early literacy promotion.
Our project provides and studies the effects of the addition of a library of culturally relevant children’s literature and artwork in the UL Pediatric Clinic, and interactive read aloud for two hours each afternoon provided by Black male volunteers. Our research interests focus on the effects of the read aloud experience on the volunteer readers who have experienced opportunity gaps in our community; and the nature of patients’ and caregivers’ book engagement as an essential part of early literacy learning (Lennox, 2013; Owocki & Goodman, 2002). In addition, our team is cognizant of and attentive to the novel, challenging, and transformative nature of our transdisciplinary social justice work and partnership.

Speakers
avatar for Faye Jones

Faye Jones

Assoc. VP for Health Affairs/Diversity Initiatives, University of Louisville
Dr. Jones is a tenured professor of pediatrics and joined UofL in 1990. In addition to her role in pediatrics she currently serves as the Associate Vice President for Health Affairs -Diversity Initiatives and Vice Chair for the Department of Pediatrics-Inclusive Excellence. With... Read More →
KW

Kathryn Whitmore

Director of the Early Childhood Research Center, University of Louisville


Wednesday October 11, 2017 9:00am - 9:30am
Colorado G

9:00am

Career Development and Social Justice as Drivers of College Readiness: St. John's University Staten Island Campus's Educational Partnerships (30 mins)
Since 2013, St. John’s University’s Staten Island campus has successfully adopted an urban extension branch campus strategy that has significantly increased local high school students’ access to private higher education. Leveraging the metropolitan history of St. John’s as a pathway to professions, Early Start Academy has broken down academic and financial barriers to college readiness for underrepresented groups by bringing high school cohorts to campus for college courses in their future major. St. John’s Early Start program makes a distinctive contribution to the NYC DOE’s pre-college credit initiative by connecting high school students to their future major and career. Guiding the intervention in select schools is a class-room based guidance counselor placement that uses the career development curricula of M. S. School Counselling students to measure the effectiveness of career goal-setting on high school students' pre-college credits.

For 2017, St. John’s Staten Island campus Early Start Academy is paired with "Difference Makers," adding civic engagement to career development and academic preparedness as college readiness measures. Difference Makers matches Early Start Academy high school cohorts with St. John’s University’s community partner, Central Family Life Center, for capacity building projects that build St. John’s Catholic social justice mission and award winning academic service learning program into high school students’ academic preparedness. Together Early Start Academy and Difference Makers represent a distinctive approach to higher education college readiness initiatives that use the value-added outcomes of academics—career development and civic engagement—to engage St. John’s traditional constituency, underrepresented groups and first-generation college students.

Speakers
RF

Robert Fanuzzi

Associate Provost and Director of Civic Engagement, St. John's University Staten Island Campus
WR

William Reisel

St. John's University


Wednesday October 11, 2017 9:00am - 9:30am
Colorado J

9:00am

Flipping the Classroom in Metropolis: Critical Geography, Curriculum, Pedagogy and the Art of Leadership (30 mins)
Colleges and Universities share the responsibility of transmitting and producing knowledge. Higher education creates environments that inform our future citizenry, and serve as an influential institution in the promotion of civil society. However, higher education is also space where prevailing social, political, cultural and economic ideologies are contested. The validation of knowledge is among the most contested ideas, especially as we consider how certain groups cultural and indigenous insights are marginalized, by Western constructs of knowledge validation. In this session, the presenters will share their experiences teaching a graduate leadership course. The course explored the classic paradox, "Does art imitate life or does life imitate art?” to make clear the mutual and recursive connections between leadership, art, and community, by exploring the metropolitan artistic mediums of graffiti, car culture and prison art. Flipping the classroom in our context required the students to take advantage of the de-professional knowledge and other ways of knowing found in urban and metropolitan areas. The students surrounding communities were situated as critical geographic spaces for analysis, inquiry and the praxis of leadership, as well as the ongoing production of intersectional identities. Presenters will share elements of their syllabus, excerpts from student journals, examples of individual cajita (sacred box) projects, as well an original piece of art the students produced as a part of their group presentation.

Speakers
avatar for Issac Carter

Issac Carter

Assistant Professor, University of LaVerne
Issac Carter, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor and Program Chair for the Social justice Higher Education Program for the LaFetra College of Education, at the University of La Verne. Dr. Carter’s research interests are interdisciplinary and foreground Intersectionality, Critical... Read More →
BG

Beatriz Gonzalez

Vice Provost & Chief Diversity Officer, University of La Verne


Wednesday October 11, 2017 9:00am - 9:30am
Colorado H

9:00am

The Urban Immersion Advantage: An Interdisciplinary Perspective on First Year Immersion Classes and Student Retention for Universities with Non-Traditional Student Populations (30 mins)
This paper makes the case for First Year Immersion Classes as a way to increase student retention, especially in public urban universities like the University of Southern Maine (USM) that tend to have a high percentage of first generation, non-traditional students with significant challenges to completing a degree such as working full-time and family responsibilities. Tourism & Hospitality (TAH) is one of the fastest growing degree programs at USM and the Department of Environmental Science & Policy (ESP) has one of the highest retention rates of all programs. Both TAH and ESP work together and require an Intensive Immersion Class for all new majors. This class brings students to a Maine summer camp for a long weekend of meeting faculty and community partners, working on group projects, getting introduced to the professional practices that will make them successful in class as well as in the workforce, and just as importantly, building a sense of community among themselves. According to research by Sanford and Michaud-Stutzman, USM students not only value community-engaged learning activities in their classes for the knowledge and job connections that they gain, but also for the community it builds with their fellow students working together on something challenging and meaningful. This sense of “belonging” is argued to be a vital factor for success in college and an important driver in the retention of students in non-traditional, urban Universities. First Year Immersion Experiences directly foster this sense of community right from the start.

Speakers
RS

Robert Sanford

Professor of Environmental Science & Policy, University of Southern Maine
TM

Tracy Michaud Stutzman

Chair, Tourism & Hospitality, University of Southern Maine


Wednesday October 11, 2017 9:00am - 9:30am
Colorado C

9:00am

The Changing Landscape of Higher Education: Working within Complex Systems (45 mins)
This mini-workshop will address two key questions. What kinds of learning will be needed to foster the kind of intelligence and abilities that our graduates will need in order to reason, plan, solve problems, think both abstractly and concretely, comprehend complex issues and work with others to identify effective responses and solutions for them, learn quickly and learn from their own experience and from the insights of others? How can we serve all of our students well and create educational environments that support student success and serve the needs of society well? How will our institutions interact with society at large to respond to the challenges that our communities face in an era of remarkable social, economic and environmental change? This mini-workshop will provide an opportunity to discuss how the Academy will adapt to serve these needs through an understanding of the nature of complex systems, the use of design thinking and new forms of university-community engagement and a deeper understanding of the nature of change. We will discuss how to create the capacity to work together in new ways, to define success differently and to learn in new, more integrative ways that foster the intellectual skills and inclinations that our graduates will need. After a brief introduction, the mini-workshop will be shaped around a few key questions that change-makers and innovators need to explore as they seek to prepare their institutions and their graduates for life and work in a new era.

Speakers
avatar for Judith Ramaley

Judith Ramaley

President Emerita, Portland State University
Dr. Judith A. Ramaley is President Emerita and Distinguished Professor of Public Service at Portland State University in the Mark O. Hatfield School of Government and President Emerita of Winona State University. From 2005-2012, she served as President of Winona State University... Read More →


Wednesday October 11, 2017 9:00am - 9:45am
Colorado D

9:00am

Engaging through a Public Policy Center (60 mins)
Many CUMU member institutions (roughly 60%) have centers that focus on public policy in some shape or form. Some are focused on public policy generally, some are focused on a specific type of policy, some focus on civic engagement through policy matters, others do applied policy research, etc. In other words, there are a lot of institutions who have centers like this, but many others do not. Conference attendees may be interested in forming one on their campus. This panel brings together representatives from member institutions who have started policy centers to discuss different forms and types of engagement that are possible through these centers. In addition, panel participants represent different types of policy centers as well as policy centers that are at different stages of a center’s lifespan – both well-established centers and newly created centers. Lessons learned through the creation of centers as well as keeping a center going will be helpful to those who are interested in starting a policy-focused center on their campus.

Speakers
PA

P. Ann Cotten

Director, Schaefer Center for Public Policy, University of Baltimore Schaefer Center for Public Policy
JD

Jerry Deichert

Director, UNO Center for Public Affairs Research
DD

Dave Dulio

Professor, Oakland University
GH

Greg Hill

Director, Idaho Policy Institute
avatar for Raphael Sonenshein

Raphael Sonenshein

Executive Director, Pat Brown Institute CSULA


Wednesday October 11, 2017 9:00am - 10:00am
Colorado B

9:00am

The dynamics of innovation: How Denver’s universities have fostered the cultural and creative environment for Colorado’s economic juggernaut (60 mins)
Forbes named Denver as the best place for business and careers for the second straight year thanks to its diverse economy, growth outlook and educated workforce. US News & World Report voted Denver the best place to live in America while nearby Boulder has the highest density of startups in the country. Companies are expanding their work forces and workplaces and unemployment is at its lowest rate — about 3 percent in the first quarter of 2017 — in more than 15 years.

Experts from the University of Colorado Denver (CU Denver), Metropolitan State University of Denver (MSU Denver), and University of Denver (DU) will come together to discuss how their institutions have helped shape the cultural and creative climate for business innovation and social entrepreneurship and how they are creating the optimal conditions for the innovation spirit to impact campus culture.

Speakers
MM

Madhavan "MP" Parthasarathy

Director of Jake Labs Center for Entrepreneurship, University of Colorado Denver
avatar for Blair Quiring

Blair Quiring

Office and Events Coordinator/CAVEA, Metropolitan State University of Denver
avatar for Nina Sharma

Nina Sharma

Managing Director, Project X-ITE, The University of Denver
Nina Sharma is the Associate Director of Project X-ITE at the University of Denver. She launched her career in nonprofit institutional fundraising and partnership development, holding operational roles at the New York Public Library, Carnegie Hall, Yale University, the Ad Council, First Descents, PepPod, and Handshake. She previously worked at Millennium Promise, the operational arm of Dr. Jeffrey... Read More →


Wednesday October 11, 2017 9:00am - 10:00am
Colorado A

9:30am

Chalkboard Talk: How our relationship with a K-12 school district reshaped our impact and theirs (30 mins)
Denver Public Schools (DPS) and the University of Colorado Denver (CU Denver) School of Education and Human Development (SEHD) formalized a research collaborative in fall 2010, modeled loosely after the successful collaborative Consortium on Chicago School Research (CCSR). A key lesson from CCSR was that the partnership had to be equally beneficial to both institutions. As the DPS school district sought assistance in carrying out studies of importance to the district, sharing technical expertise, knowledge leading to improved outcomes for students, and visibility as a district engaged in important research, CU Denver sought access to data and research sites, strong relationships with schools and educational leaders, and opportunities to impact practice through significant research. Partnership work in 2010 through 2012 resulted in a number of useful studies, with a focus on success of English language learners and research on novice teacher preparation and early career development.

Inspired partly by successful research-and-practice partnerships such as SERP, Collective Impact, and STRIVE, SEHD expanded the model piloted by CCSR to develop the Center for Practice Engaged Education Research. C-PEER develops and supports university/practice site partnerships to co-design and conduct applied research. Studies are designed in iterative cycles to maximize early value of the research while serving original partnership goals of linking technical expertise and data access in service of research helping to improve problems of practice. C-PEER supports both faculty and student researchers in a variety of research partnerships.

Speakers
AD

Alan Davis

Professor, CU Denver
KS

Kent Seidel

Assoc Professor, University of Colorado Denver


Wednesday October 11, 2017 9:30am - 10:00am
Colorado J

9:30am

Get the Word Out: Advocacy and the Impact on Student Growth (30 mins)
Since 2012, the University of Nebraska at Omaha Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders has collaborated with Omaha Public Schools’ Blackburn Alternative Program, with the support of the UNO Service Learning Academy, to identify important community issues and design impactful projects focused on advocacy efforts that support student growth and learning.  

This presentation is designed to describe the core content of an undergraduate service learning course that includes oral histories of local civil rights leaders and the impact on students’ perceptions of agency and subsequent academic growth. As a collaborative P-16 project, university students partner with students who attend the local alternative high school program. Both university and high school students are actively engaged in all facets of design, including the planning, development, and implementation of project activities. Of note is the past limited success of the high school students in traditional educational environments; thus, their enrollment in the alternative program. Yet, consistently, since the initiation of the project partnership in 2012, student engagement has supported the demonstration of academic proficiency for each of the stated project outcomes. For example, in 2014, project partners were selected to receive a Carter Award for Service Learning by the Nebraska State Council for Social Studies (NSCSS) for the Traffic Control Project which resulted in a reduction of the speed limit outside the school. Project activities are designed to highlight authentic opportunities for the successful use of language and communication skills. The project title, “Get the Word Out,” summarizes this goal of advocacy.

Speakers
CN

Cathy Nelson

Teacher Leader, Omaha Public Schools
Service Learning
avatar for Mitzi Ritzman

Mitzi Ritzman

Associate Professor, University of Nebraska Omaha


Wednesday October 11, 2017 9:30am - 10:00am
Colorado C

9:30am

Pathways to Brain Health for African Americans: A Model for Promoting Research and Engagement (30 mins)
It is well documented that African Americans are at elevated risk for age-related cognitive decline and memory loss, having double the prevalence of Alzheimer’s as white Americans. This health disparity is believed to be primarily due to changeable health and lifestyle factors although other variables, including genetics and education, may also influence cognitive resilience and risk for Alzheimer’s disease in African Americans.

The Office of University-Community Partnerships serves as a nexus that connects Rutgers University-Newark-students, faculty and staff-to forge, create and promote reciprocal and mutually beneficial partnerships that support and align with institutional strategic engagement priorities. Our model employs key elements of successful partnerships which includes, building trust, cultivating meaningful, sustainable relationships, leveraging resources, integrating expertise, intentional action and alignment.

Building on a decade of trust established through community engagement with community leaders and residents, our approach to outreach is guided by the principles of Community-Based Participatory Inclusion(CBPI) in which community members are actively involved in all stages of planning, implementation, and evaluation.
Over the last decade, the Rutgers University-Newark African American Brain Health Initiative (AABHI) has offered community education and interventions to address brain and mental health disparities in the local African-American community, serving over 5000 residents.
Working in collaboration with local community-based, faith-based, and public housing organizations throughout Greater Newark and Northern New Jersey—and with the support of city, county, and state offices for health and aging—our multi-disciplinary team provides health educational programming and research participation to address early cognitive decline in older African Americans.

Speakers
DH

Diane Hill

Assistant Chancellor, Rutgers University - Newark


Wednesday October 11, 2017 9:30am - 10:00am
Colorado G

9:30am

Transfer Student Methods Revealed: Easy Ways to Increase Your Retention & Graduation Numbers (30 mins)
Community College Transfer Students can and do SUCCEED! Learn some of the best practices of the top 4-year institutions for Colorado community college transfers. As the only tri-institutional campus in the country, there is potential for contention and leaving students isolated to find their own way. MSU Denver, CU Denver, and the Community College of Denver transfer team will discuss how they implement transfer guides, admissions promise agreements, recruitment, articulation agreements, and other innovative collaborative methods to help their Transfer Students thrive and SUCCEED.

Speakers
JG

Josh Gabrielson

Assoc Dir of Admissions, Transfer Services, Metropolitan State University of Denver
AM

Abby Muro

University of Colorado Denver


Wednesday October 11, 2017 9:30am - 10:00am
Colorado H

9:45am

Impacting the Health of Your Community: Launching Points for an Anchor Institution (45 mins)
Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) is a major urban public research university located in downtown Richmond, VA and is one of the country’s few comprehensive health science centers, training the largest number of healthcare professionals in the state. VCU is the only academic medical center in the region and the largest provider of indigent care in Virginia. VCU and the VCU Health System share a vision that all faculty, staff, students and trainees are committed to improving the health and well being of populations served in our local communities. Join us to learn how, starting at ground zero, we have embarked on an institution-wide effort to achieve that vision by developing a strategic plan to identify and address health inequities. This undertaking has required infrastructure development, stakeholder engagement and consensus building. Participants will learn the processes and steps used to take an abstract goal and make it attainable, including: starting with literature reviews and community identified needs, developing a mission and vision, aligning with local, state and national priorities, convening partners, gaining university wide attention, and ultimately crafting an implementation plan. Participants will also gain an understanding of health related social issues and their impact on health outcomes. Much of this work is accomplished in work groups, and participants will have the opportunity to draft recommendations, debate critical issues and use interactive, online tools.

Speakers
AM

Anne Massey

Director of Sponsored Projects & Prog Planning, VCU Office of Health Innovation
LV

logan vetrovec

Community Integration Administrator, VCU


Wednesday October 11, 2017 9:45am - 10:30am
Colorado D

10:00am

(Re)building Routes: How a Catholic Jesuit University is Finding its Way Back to American Indian Communities (30 mins)
Even as colleges are becoming more diverse, American Indian and Alaskan Natives continue to be one of the most underrepresented populations. Of total college enrollment in the United States, they make up only 1% of the student body. Less than half will graduate. The gap in postsecondary participation and achievement is disquieting with (in)direct benefits that never flow to these students. The imperative to metaphorically (re)build the routes traversed by the 17th-century Jesuit missionary and explorer Father Jacques Marquette became clear for Marquette University. Guided by the institution’s strong social justice and inclusion mission the Office of Public Affairs engages tribes and their citizens on campus-wide programs and initiatives that acknowledges and respects their inherent tribal sovereignty. Responsible for governmental and community relations, Marquette University’s Office of Public Affairs has been a natural hub to nurture a consultative relationship with tribes. As an example, the newly formed Council on Native American Affairs will help guide the university on cultural and academic programming, policy, student services, Milwaukee Indian community and tribal engagement, as well as research initiatives as it pertains to American Indian communities. This collective of best practices is intended to enliven the university's mission, engender trust with tribes to further bidirectional collaborations and demonstrate that their constituents can find a home at Marquette University.

Speakers
RA

Rana Altenburg

Vice President, Marquette University
JS

Jacqueline Schram

Director/Spec. Asst. for Native American Affairs, Marquette University


Wednesday October 11, 2017 10:00am - 10:30am
Colorado G

10:00am

A Needs Assessment of LGBTQ+ Communities in Southeast Wisconsin: A University and Community Partnership ( 30 mins)
In 2016, Cream City Foundation, a Milwaukee based non-profit organization partnered with Marquette University’s Center for Gender and Sexualities Studies to assess the needs and concerns facing lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, queer, plus (LGBTQ+) people in southeast Wisconsin post marriage equality. Interviews were conducted with 27 community leaders and representatives from 23 different organizations serving LGBTQ+ people in southeastern Wisconsin, with a particular focus on organizations in Milwaukee, the state’s most populous city. Respondents emphasized the diversity of identities, experiences, and oppressions within LGBTQ+ communities. Findings highlight the additional concerns facing LGBTQ+ people of color, those who are trans, live in rural communities, and/or are economically disadvantaged. Findings highlight the disparate impact of racial segregation and poverty in Milwaukee on these communities; and, the need for a deeper understanding of how the intersections of race, class, gender identity, and sexuality influence the lives and experiences of LGBTQ+ people in southeast Wisconsin. This project serves as an example of a successful collaborative effort between a community-based organization and university research center. In fact, due to the partnership and research, the foundation has chosen to become a convening organization in an effort to bring LGBTQ+ organizations together to address issues of poverty, health, and community engagement and support and shift funding to address these areas. Attendees will learn about ways that they can develop similar efforts between community-based organizations and departments and centers at their institutions.

Speakers
AH

Angie Harris

Associate Professor, Social and Cultural Sciences, Marquette University


Wednesday October 11, 2017 10:00am - 10:30am
Colorado J

10:00am

Documenting Student Civic Learning Through the new IUPUI Comprehensive Student Records Project (30 mins)
This interactive presentation will detail the Sam H. Jones (SHJ) Community Service Scholarship program, its assessment, and the process for documenting the Scholars’ assessed learning through the Registrar. With increasing calls for higher education to recognize student learning that occurs in numerous places and ways outside of traditional classroom settings, Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis (IUPUI) was invited to participate in the AACRAO/NASPA/Lumina project to create a comprehensive student record that includes more than the “official academic record”. Known as REAL (Record of Experiential and Applied Learning), the goal of this co-curricular transcript is to document a student achievement record of assessed learning experiences that have occurred outside of the classroom. This Registrar-verified REAL record will also include a link to student self-reported co-curricular activities.
One of many ways IUPUI demonstrates its commitment to both community engagement and fostering student civic learning is through the SHJ Community Service Scholarship program, one of the nation’s largest service-based scholarship programs. Since 1994, this campus program has awarded over 2,700 scholarships, totaling over $6 million. The purpose of this program is to recognize students’ prior service contributions to the community and foster their civic learning and community involvement. Scholars work with community partners on various community activities (e.g., tutoring, urban farming, advocacy). Since the SHJ Program’s inception, the Center for Service and Learning (CSL) has annually assessed the Scholars learning (e.g., civic, cognitive). These assessments are ongoing, rigorous, and widely shared. Their inclusion in the REAL represents the further institutionalization of co-curricular service.

Speakers
avatar for Lorrie Brown

Lorrie Brown

Director of Student and Staff Engagement, Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis
TH

Tom Hahn

Director of Research and Program Evaluation, Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis


Wednesday October 11, 2017 10:00am - 10:30am
Colorado H

10:00am

Experiential Learning to Teach in Classrooms (30 mins)
This presentation builds on research presented in 2016 based on experiential learning activities used by teacher preparation faculty in an urban setting. The experiential learning activities included activities in elementary classrooms, an activity is in a museum, and one activity at a zoo. Experiential learning activities are designed to engage pre-service teachers with practical experience for assessing students, designing curriculum and instructional plans, and implementing intervention instruction or presenting general lessons. The current presentation will focus on two subsequent experiential learning practices implemented in an urban setting. One practice is a yearlong residence model that includes one semester of co-teaching on Mondays and Wednesday the semester before a full-time, semester student-teaching experience. The observation data is coded by areas of reinforcement and areas of refinement, which provide the faculty with evidence of how well students transfer theory to practice. This new development in teacher preparation provides data beyond determining the knowledge and skills that emerging teachers perceive they gain from participating in experiential learning activities in community and K-12 settings to actually observing emerging teachers in the classroom setting. Finally, the presentation will introduce a new experiential project that will begin in the summer 2017 to advance the teaching of science in the urban setting. Similar experiential practices will be used in the new practice.

Speakers
SD

Sarah Davenport

Experiential Learning Coordinator, University of North Texas at Dallas
GM

Glenda Moss

Professor, University of North Texas at Dallas
Yearlong Student Teaching Residency | Experiential Learning | Multicultural learning


Wednesday October 11, 2017 10:00am - 10:30am
Colorado C

10:00am

Impacting the Local Community with the Center for Business and Economic Analysis: Successes, Challenges, and Ideas (30 mins)
The Center for Business and Economic Analysis (CBEA) is designed to work with the local business and nonprofit community in Northeast WI to serve as a source for information, a source of networking and collaboration, and a source of problem solving. The CBEA comprises several St. Norbert College faculty members and a team of our top students in business and economics to provide community-partner research, community-based research, speaking engagements and consulting services. In our short 3-year tenure, we have completed 9 public talks and 15 community focused projects. This best practices session will highlight the creation of our Center, the successes, the challenges, and an overview of projects and approaches we have taken to bettering our community to have a lasting impact.

Speakers
JO

Jamie O'Brien

Associate Professor of Business/Director of CBEA, St. Norbert College
MS

Marc Schaffer

Associate Professor of Economics/Director of CBEA, St. Norbert College


Wednesday October 11, 2017 10:00am - 10:30am
Colorado B

10:00am

Sparking Innovation and entrepreneurship via library makerspaces (30 mins)
This session will talk about the development of library’s makerspace and its collaboration with the business school and college of Art and Science to serve as an incubator and entrepreneurship center for students. The speaker will focus on the impact of maker culture and makerspace in student learning (theory to practice), job opportunities creations(internship positions as well as revenue generation positions), community engagement (solving problem for the community). The speaker will share their vision of a maker centered education that will give students opportunities to learn and deliver results to their community at the same time that will lead to entrepreneurship opportunities for the students while they are still at college.

Speakers
AJ

Amy Jiang

Library Technology, University of La Verne
VT

Vinaya Tripuraneni

University Librarian, University of La Verne



Wednesday October 11, 2017 10:00am - 10:30am
Colorado A

10:45am

Oklahoma City’s Emerging Hispanic Community: New Partnerships, New Successes ( 30 mins)
The University of Central Oklahoma’s new strategic plan sought to increase its connection to the emerging Hispanic community in Oklahoma City. Simultaneously, the Greater Oklahoma City Hispanic Chamber of Commerce was seeking a higher education partner. This case study describes resulting new programs for Hispanic students and businesses. The relationship inspired the newly formed UCO Latino Faculty & Staff Association to connect UCO to the Hispanic community while providing greater opportunities for Hispanic student success. (Featured in Metro Journal, 27,3, pp.136-155.)

Speakers
MK

Mark Kinders

VP for Public Affairs, University of Central Oklahoma
Government relations (state and federal) | Corporate relations | Veterans affairs | K-12 STEM education alliance
MP

Myron Pope

VP for Student Affairs, University of Central Oklahoma


Wednesday October 11, 2017 10:45am - 11:15am
Colorado J

10:45am

Soul Food: Music as a Ladder and a Bridge (30 mins)
Soul Food is a highly successful music series presented by the Pontiac Arts Commission and sponsored by the OU/Pontiac Initiative. Pontiac is a diverse city of 60,000 residents located just west of Oakland University (OU). After an election cycle fueled by divisive vitriol, Prof. Mark Stone (Arts Area Leader of the OU/Pontiac Initiative) and Dwayne Anthony (Community Partner) created a series of special music events entitled “Soul Food,” designed to unite their fractured community as it emerged from seven challenging years of state oversight under an emergency manager.

The resulting concert series has been a celebration of the oneness of humanity. At each event, people from varied cultural and spiritual backgrounds gather to share music and an uplifting reading from their respective tradition. This is a music event in which the descriptor of “food” is used metaphorically: attendees feed their spirits and experience the healing power of music while observing the many ways we are all connected.
For a full account of the first Soul Food gathering please visit:
https://www.oakland.edu/Assets/Oakland/mtd/files-and-documents/Music/Soul%20Food%20Article%20by%20Nancy%20Palus.pdf

In this presentation, Mark and Dwayne will describe their ongoing collaboration and the effect it has had on their broader community. They will share qualitative data gathered from participating Pontiac residents and OU students. They will also discuss challenges faced in organizing the events, fully engaging the many diverse populations of Pontiac, and immersing OU students and faculty in the process. Finally, Mark and Dwayne will reflect on the numerous rewarding outcomes of the Soul Food concert series.

Speakers
avatar for Dwayne Anthony

Dwayne Anthony

Community Relations Specialist / Arts Commissioner, City of Pontiac
I love people❤! I believe that we are all connected and share various commonalities that bind us together if we could just learn to overcome our prejudices of ethinicity, religion, and social class and realize that we are one race..Human. Music for me is the dessert of life, it... Read More →
avatar for Mark Stone

Mark Stone

Assoc. Prof. of Music, Oakland University
Mark Stone is Associate Professor of Music at Oakland University, where he coordinates the world music and percussion programs. He is also the Arts Area Leader for the OU/Pontiac Initiative and a member of the Pontiac Arts Commission. Through the OU/Pontiac Initiative, Mark recen... Read More →


Wednesday October 11, 2017 10:45am - 11:15am
Colorado H

10:45am

Public-Private Partnerships aren't New in Higher Education (45 mins)
Benjamin Franklin's American Philosophical Society of Philadelphia and the Pennsylvania House of Representatives collaborated to create the University of Pennsylvania, whose stated purpose was to make advancements in agriculture, science and medicine available to the public.

Today, there are urgent, compelling educational and financial reasons to accelerate development of public-private partnerships among universities and their communities.
The definition of evolution can be summed up in a single, pithy phrase from the 2012 film Moneyball—Adapt or Die. The 21st century is throwing challenges at institutions of higher education at an accelerating pace, and if we can't find ways to adapt, we will be forced to shut our doors.

Discover how MSU Denver has always been a bit out-of-the-box, taking the essence of its entrepreneurial spirit, couple it with the adapt or die statement, and embed in our culture through public-private partnerships with entities such as Lockheed Martin, Detroit Institute of Music Education (DIME) Denver and more.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Kreidler

Steve Kreidler

Vice President Administration, Metropolitan State University of Denver


Wednesday October 11, 2017 10:45am - 11:30am
Colorado D

10:45am

Role Making versus Role Taking: Presidential Adaptation to Board Relations (45 mins)
This presentation will define the clear difference between role making and role taking for both presidents and board members. The path chosen will influence the relationship between the board and president and set the tone for the governance of the university. Setting and understanding expectations, building systems and processes, and board development will be a central focus. In the current culture of rapid turnover of both presidents and board members, and the often-negative consequences for the organization and the region where it resides, this presentation offers tools for building trust and capacity for a successful leadership model which will be shared.

Adaptive leadership will be considered. It is the role of the president to adapt to the governing board when appointed. It is also critical to assimilate into the culture of the organization and geographic region where the university lives. That being said, the president also has the opportunity to construct the foundation that their tenure will be built upon. The relationship between the university in urban environments, and that larger community, and the responsibility to their students will underpin the discussion. The need for creating a psychologically safe environment for board and presidential relationships is essential and will be explored.

Speakers
avatar for Kimberly Luse

Kimberly Luse

Principal and Founder, Strategic Ethical Solutions, International
Strategic Ethical Solutions, International is an organization that works hard for their clients. | Kimberly Luse is the Principal and Founder. With more than 25 years of experience in the medical field and higher education arena, she brings a unique skill set to the table. As a... Read More →
JM

John Mancinelli

Chief of Staff & Operations, Washington State University Tri-Cities


Wednesday October 11, 2017 10:45am - 11:30am
Colorado C

10:45am

Assessing Community Impact: Moving from Problems to Outcomes (90 mins)
Measuring community impact involves a process of understanding how our community efforts move beyond simple product outputs to creating observable change in a community setting. The purpose of this presentation will be engage participants in an interactive experience that models the process of designing a community impact strategy. The presenter will distinguish between community outputs and community impact and engage participants in a series of activities that will challenge them to move beyond the typical boundaries of university-community relations into building mutually beneficial partnerships that identify needs, assets, strategies, and solutions. While traditional evaluations of community partnerships focus on the benefits to the university, this process will encourage participants to design strategies that can measure the efforts of our community engagement strategies in addressing the “wicked problems” that exist in our communities. Particular focus will be devoted to developing strategies to leverage funding, expertise, and resources to address a specified community problem.

Speakers
avatar for Marina Barnett

Marina Barnett

Associate Professor, Widener University
Marina Barnett, DSW is currently an Associate Professor in Widener | University’s Center for Social Work Education. Dr Barnett teaches Social | Welfare Policy, Organizational Practice and Grant Writing and Community | Organization at the BSW, MSW and Ph.D. levels. Dr. B... Read More →


Wednesday October 11, 2017 10:45am - 12:15pm
Colorado G

10:45am

Why Boston (or Any Other Urban Location)?: A Competitive Advantage for Diversity (90 mins)
Boston is a highly-educated city with world-class colleges and universities who boast impressive retention and graduation rates. Despite the success, Boston higher education institutions continue to struggle with recruiting, retaining and graduating a diverse student body. Based on 2015 data from the National Center for Education Statistics, only 16.1% of 4-year undergraduate enrollment at Boston-based colleges and universities were Black or Hispanic students. At Boston Public Schools, in 2015-2016, 73.9% of students classified themselves as Black or Hispanic. Yet, with such opportunities in our backyard, college and universities in Boston, San Francisco, New York, etc., recruit students from all over the country to meet their diversity goals, usually targeting and developing programming for high-achieving students, while failing to create an equitable opportunity for all students to achieve life-long success. In the current environment, where higher education and industry seek creative responses to the changing demographics, the most dedicated staff and faculty of institutions are uniquely positioned to help guide women and underrepresented minorities from Boston and other urban areas into the 21st century workforce.

This comprehensive session will focus on creating a body of knowledge about the opportunities and challenges colleges and universities face in developing extensive college access and success partnerships, programming, financial aid opportunities, and support services for local, low-income and/or underrepresented minority students. At the end of the session, all materials will be collected by the facilitators to document the conversations and compile a report that will be emailed to attendees with follow-up opportunities.

Speakers
avatar for Erik Miller

Erik Miller

Director, Community & Learning Partnerships, Wentworth Institute of Technology


Wednesday October 11, 2017 10:45am - 12:15pm
Colorado B

10:45am

Placed-Based Community Engagement Initiatives: A National Perspective (90 mins)
Widely known through the work of the Harlem Children’s Zone and the federal government’s Promise and Choice Neighborhood programs, geographically specific initiatives have the potential to positively address the challenge of concentrated poverty. While we may be familiar with these types of initiatives based out of non-profit organizations or governmental grants, less is known about this type of strategy in higher education.

Recently, some universities have also taken on this geographically specific strategy. This session will explore a newer type of initiative: place-based community engagement (PBCE). PBCE is unique in that such initiatives are an institution-wide strategy that’s geographically concentrated with a long-term engagement plan with the target community (Koth, 2013). Drawing from four campuses from the Northwest (Seattle University), West (University of San Diego, and Mid Atlantic (Loyola University Maryland and Drexel University), our panelists will engage in a conversation to share lessons learned and promising practices as their campuses have engaged in this strategy. We will do this by engaging panelists in a discussion on how campuses began their exploring and planning process for their initiative. Panelists will then share what implementation has looked like. Lastly, the panelists will share what they are doing to sustain such initiatives in a climate of political and economic uncertainty.

Speakers
JJ

Jennifer Johnson Kebea

Executive Director, Lindy Center for Civic Engagement, Drexel University
KK

Kent Koth

Executive Director, Center for Community Engagement, Seattle University Center for Community Engagement
avatar for Christopher Nayve

Christopher Nayve

Associate Vice President Community Engagement, University of San Diego
avatar for Erin O'Keefe

Erin O'Keefe

Director, Center for Community, Loyola University (Baltimore)
Erin S. O’Keefe, M.P.P., serves as director for Loyola’s Center for Community Service and Justice, overseeing university-community partnerships, student and faculty community engagement, and the university’s York Road Initiative, a place-based community development effort... Read More →
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Esteban del Rio

Associate Provost, University of San Diego's Center for Inclusion & Diversity
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Erica Yamamura

Associate Professor, Seattle University


Wednesday October 11, 2017 10:45am - 12:15pm
Colorado A

11:15am

Engaging Latino Communities - Cultivando Respeto (30 mins)
We will provide an overview of the successful strategies used by the NLRC to engage the diverse Latino communities in our region. We will focus on long term and time-sensitive strategies, inter-generational connections, and growing partnerships within the university and among non-profits in North County San Diego. We will highlight the evidence of cultivating respect and community responsiveness through effective projects on health, education, civic engagement, incarceration, re-entry, food insecurity, migrant labor, and immigrant youth. We will share challenges and how we worked with our partners in the community to overcome them. Finally, we will present current outcomes of a two year study on civic engagement that tests the effectiveness of a Spanish-language curriculum based on popular education that has been offered (free) to members of urban and rural low-resourced communities.

Speakers
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marisolcsusm

Fac Director & Sociology Professor, NLRC CSUSM
Mibanez@csusm.edu
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Arcela Nunez-Alvarez

Research Director, National Latino Research Center


Wednesday October 11, 2017 11:15am - 11:45am
Colorado J

11:15am

How Engaging Music Students in the Community is a Win Win Proposition for Community Partners and College Students (30 mins)
Speakers
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Susan Mohini Kane

Faculty, California State University, Los Angeles
Singer, teacher, author of The 21st Century Singer: Making the Leap from the University into the World (Oxford, 2015)


Wednesday October 11, 2017 11:15am - 11:45am
Colorado H

11:30am

An Equity Lens for Community Engagement: A Discussion on the What, Why, and How
Speakers
avatar for Matt Durington

Matt Durington

Professor, Towson University
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Jessica Shiller

Associate Professor, Towson University
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Santiago Solis

Associate Vice President for Student Affairs, Towson University


Wednesday October 11, 2017 11:30am - 12:15pm
Colorado C

11:30am

The Campus Kitchens Project: Using Food as a Tool to Strengthen Communities (45 mins)
Attendees will get an in depth look at The Campus Kitchens Project (CKP) and will be empowered to bring the program to their school. CKP students on 61 campuses are already transforming unused food from dining halls into meals that are delivered to those in need. The session will highlight what Campus Kitchens do and how to bring the program to their school. It will also provide methodology on topics like Asset-Based Community Development and community asset mapping, which are valuable when applied to any student service enterprise and show how these teachings are used by Campus Kitchens to break down barriers between schools and the surrounding communities. We will highlight how Campus Kitchens use “food as a tool” to provide more than just meals and strengthen the community as a whole. The entire affiliation process, as well as the value of CKP will be presented and attendees will leave this session with the knowledge and tools to go back to their school and start a Campus Kitchen.

Speakers
avatar for Matt Schnarr

Matt Schnarr

Donor Relations Manager, The Campus Kitchens Project


Wednesday October 11, 2017 11:30am - 12:15pm
Colorado D

11:45am

Implementing Black Male Initiative Programs: A Model for Promoting African-American Male Success at a Metropolitan University (30 mins)
The impetus behind this presentation is to provide practitioners the transparency of executing a Black Male Initiative and Fellows Program. The Black Male Initiative & Fellows Program (BMI) is a first-year retention program at the University of Central Oklahoma that provides curricular and co-curricular experiences for black males that ensures their success academically, professionally, and socially. During the three years of its existence, BMI has reported a 68% retention rate for first-time, full-time Black male students, a 20% retention increase, as well as a grade point increase of 12% compared to students who are not in the program.

By focusing on the areas of messaging, monitoring, ministering/mentoring and money, The University of Central Oklahoma has created a framework for institutions of higher learning – specifically predominantly white, metropolitan institutions – that could be implemented to combat the social and cultural barriers that African-American males encounter during or before their college experience.

Using Critical Race Theory and Dr. Shaun Harper’s anti-deficit framework as the theoretical structure for the Black Male Initiative program, this presentation will further report the planning for the program, illustrate the significance of recruiting, retaining and graduating Black males and the transformative implications of African-American male success.

Speakers
MC

MeShawn Conley

Director, Diversity & Inclusion, University of Central Oklahoma
SJ

Stevie Johnson

Assistant Director, Diversity & Inclusion, University of Central Oklahoma


Wednesday October 11, 2017 11:45am - 12:15pm
Colorado H

11:45am

Teaching Faculty to Teach Civic Engagement: Interdisciplinary Models to Facilitate Pedagogical Success

This presentation will showcase faculty development programming designed to support and encourage the incorporation of civic engagement assignments within normal curricular offerings. This research assessed faculty development seminars at two comprehensive institutions, and identified the perceived benefits of faculty as well as where improvements might be made. The research utilized focus groups with participating faculty, and found several key factors for success. During this short presentation, I will share the factors as a model for universities wanting to develop programs to support faculty civic engagement efforts.


Speakers
CJ

Chris Jensen

Director, Towson University


Wednesday October 11, 2017 11:45am - 12:15pm
Colorado J

12:15pm

Wednesday Luncheon Plenary—For the Sake of All

Welcome Remarks: Rebecca Villarreal, Kresge Foundation

Keynote Speaker: Jason Purnell, Assistant Professor, Washington University in St. Louis and creator of the For the Sake of All project

Closing Remarks: Bobbie Laur, Executive Director, CUMU and Charles Rutheiser, Annie E. Casey Foundation

The 2017 conference wraps up with a final closing luncheon plenary featuring Dr. Jason Purnell, whose work is focused on health equity, poverty, and the power of data and community-wide commitment to address these challenges. Purnell is the creator of the For the Sake of All project, which focuses on improving the health of all people by eliminating racial inequities in the St. Louis region.

For the Sake of All: Improving health and well-being in St. Louis post-Ferguson
The St. Louis region became the focus of international attention after the fatal shooting of Michael Brown in the suburban town of Ferguson in August of 2014. Just months before, Jason Purnell led a team of researchers from Washington University and Saint Louis University that partnered with the community to produce For the Sake of All: A Report on the Health and Well-Being of African Americans in St. Louis—and Why It Matters for Everyone. It not only documented the racial disparities in education, economic status, and health that had long plagued the St. Louis region, but also pointed to solutions for coordinated action to address them. It was a key source for the Ferguson Commission appointed by Missouri’s governor to uncover the underlying social and economic factors leading to protests and unrest. Learn more about the report and the ambitious cross-sector, collaborative work that has emerged from it to make St. Louis a region that works for the sake of all.


Speakers
avatar for Bobbie Laur

Bobbie Laur

Executive Director, CUMU Headquarters
In my role at Towson University, I manage a dynamic team and a diverse portfolio of projects that all focus on better connecting citizens and organizations with the resources of the university. We are focused on improving the quality of life and economic competitiveness for our r... Read More →
avatar for Jason Purnell

Jason Purnell

Associate Professor, Washington University
About Jason Purnell | Jason Purnell is an assistant professor in the George Warren Brown School of Social Work at Washington University in St. Louis. He is trained in both applied psychology and public health. Dr. Purnell leads the For the Sake of All project, a multidisciplinary civic education and mobilization initiative highlighting the regional significance of disparities in health and life outcomes for African Americans in St. Louis, MO. The project and a report by the same name released in May 2014 have been a critical resource in the wake of the unrest that followed the fatal shooting of Michael Brown in the suburban St. Louis city of Ferguson in August of that year. Several of the... Read More →
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Charles Rutheiser

Senior Associate, Annie E. Casey Foundation
avatar for Rebecca Villarreal

Rebecca Villarreal

Program Officer, The Kresge Foundation


Wednesday October 11, 2017 12:15pm - 1:45pm
Colorado Ballrooms